The Washington Post

Soon, we will outlaw backpacks

New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg issued a press release on Thursday calling for background checks of purchasers of “explosive powder” (bold in original):

“Current law allows an individual to purchase as much as 50 pounds of explosive ‘black powder’ without a background check, and also permits an individual to purchase unlimited amounts of dangerous ‘smokeless powder’ and ‘black powder substitute’ without a background check. Sen. Lautenberg’s proposal would change that and require a background check for any purchase of these explosive powders. These powders can be used as the explosive material in assembling pipe bombs, used in the Columbine school shooting, and pressure cooker bombs, which may have been used in the recent Boston attack.

“‘It is outrageous that anyone, even a known terrorist, can walk into a store in America and buy explosives without any questions asked,’ said Senator Lautenberg. ‘If we are serious about public safety, we must put these common-sense safeguards in place. While the police have not revealed what specific explosive materials were used in Boston, what we do know is that explosive powder is too easy to anonymously purchase across the country.’”

I also await the federal legislation relating to pressure cookers, ball bearings, nails and, while we’re at it, backpacks.

[Continue reading Norman Leahy’s post at Bearing Drift.]

Norman Leahy blogs at Bearing Drift. The Local Blog Network is a group of bloggers from around the D.C. region who have agreed to make regular contributions to All Opinions Are Local.


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