The Washington Post

Our bus fares aren’t that cheap (if you transfer)


WMATA is considering raising bus fares, with the justification that they’re lower than in other cities. But somehow every time this topic comes up, people forget that there’s a big difference between our bus fares and other cities': Riders transferring between bus and rail pay a lot more.

The agency recently put out a survey that, among other things, asked riders what they thought about various options for a fare increase. For Metrobus, the survey asked about raising the bus fare from the current $1.60 to $1.75 or $1.85:

Passenger fares cover about 30 cents out of every dollar of the cost of providing Metrobus service. The current Metrobus fare is $1.60 for SmarTrip® and $1.80 for cash. Metrobus fares are relatively low compared to other major metropolitan areas around the country:


San Francisco & Chicago $2.00
Philadelphia $2.25
New York City & Atlanta $2.50

That makes it look like our bus fares are relatively cheap, right? Maybe compared to those cities if you’re just riding the bus. But a lot of people don’t just ride the bus. They take a bus from home to a Metrorail station and then ride the train, and back again in the evening. Or a bus to a train to another bus.

Many buses, in fact, don’t go downtown at all. They end at a Metrorail station. When Metro opened, the agency cut back many of the buses so they just fed the rail system. The same is going to happen around Tysons when the Silver Line opens (or even before).

[Continue reading David Alpert’s post at Greater Greater Washington.]

David Alpert is founder and editor of Greater Greater Washington. The Local Blog Network is a group of bloggers from around the D.C. region who have agreed to make regular contributions to All Opinions Are Local.



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