The Washington Post

Highlights from the ‘Food Security’ summit

On June 14, Washington Post Live hosted the “Future of Food: Food Security in the 21st Century ” summit, which attracted many of the best minds devoted to solving the problem of feeding the world’s ever-growing population. There was an air of urgency in the room; more than one speaker noted how food insecurity can foster political instability — the kind the scares career politicians.

In fact, a number of politicians, career or otherwise, took part in the food security summit, including U.S. Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.), who had some insightful things to say about why Americans are not embracing an agricultural lifestyle in the 21st century. (See the video after the jump.)

As a wrap-up to “Food Security in the 21st Century,” Washington Post Live has published a special section today devoted to some original essays and stories as well as highlights from the summit itself. You can read the articles, watch the videos and even review some of the tweets generated from the summit after the jump.

The special reports includes the following:

* Author Jonathan Bloom’s story on food waste and the innovative companies and cities that are dealing with it.

* FoodCorps co-founder and vegetable farmer Debra Eschmeyer’s essay on meeting the challenge issued by Prince Charles last year during the first Future of Food summit .

* AGree executive director Deborah Atwood’s essay looks at the institutions and industries that may need to be reexamined if we are to feed the Earth’s 9 billion inhabitants in 2050.

* My story on DC Central Kitchen’s attempt to fight food insecurity in Washington’s low-income neighborhoods.

Then again, some of the most provocative commentary from the “Food Security in the 21st Century” summit (or from those attending it) was never packaged into something permanent. So we’ve tried to give it some form in the package of Twitter commentary:

Tim Carman serves as the full-time writer for the Post's Food section and as the $20 Diner for the Weekend section, a double duty that requires he ingest more calories than a draft horse.


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