Hindu devotees carry an idol of elephant-headed god Ganesh for immersion in the Arabian Sea off the coast of Mumbai. (Arko Datta/Reuters)

Today, Hindus across India, Nepal, the U.S., Canada, Fiji and other locales will bring home those carefully made idols in the hopes they can invoke the god’s blessings for wisdom, prosperity and good fortune.

After 10 days of keeping Ganesh at home, devotees will bring the thousands of idols out onto the streets, where they will be carried in a procession of dancing and singing and then immersed in a river or sea.


Hindu devotees pull an idol of elephant-headed god Ganesh for immersion in the Arabian Sea off the coast of Mumbai in 2004. (Arko Datta/Reuters)

Indian collector Pabsetti Shekhar offers prayers to idols of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesh he has collected at his home in Hyderabad, Inidia. Shekar, 49, holds the largest private collection of 11,522 Ganesh idols. (Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Hindus carry idols of elephant-headed god Ganesh on a truck ahead of Ganesh Chaturthi festival in Hyderabad, India. (Mahesh Kumar A./AP)

Indian devotees offer prayers to an elephant on the occasion of the Hindu festival Ganesh Chaturthi in Ahmedabad. (Sampanthaky/AFP/Getty Images)

People transport an idol of elephant headed Hindu god Ganesh on a bullock cart ahead of Ganesh Chaturti festival in Mumbai. (Rajanish Kakade/AP)