The Washington Post

SAIC reducing workforce by 700

McLean-based Science Applications International Corp. said Tuesday it will cut 700 employees — about half of whom are locally based — as part of its annual review process.

The company said in a statement that the reductions will cut across its ranks and locations “but limit the impact on those who are delivering directly to our customers.” SAIC said it will provide training and coaching to those affected.

“These decisions were not easily made but we firmly believe that they are absolutely necessary in order for us to remain competitive,” John Jumper, SAIC’s chief executive, wrote in an e-mail to the company’s employees.

SAIC previously had 40,000 full-time employees, about 15,000 of whom are based locally. A company spokeswoman said about 330 local employees will be cut.

The move comes as SAIC has been laying the groundwork to split into two businesses: a $4 billion-a-year government services company specializing in areas like systems engineering and program office support, and a $7 billion-a-year technology business with a focus in areas like intelligence and cybersecurity.

SAIC announced last month that Jumper will head the larger of the two businesses. Tony Moraco, who heads SAIC’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance group, will lead the smaller company.

The split is expected to be complete by the end of next year.



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