The Washington Post

PM Update: Big storms may blow out heat Friday

Record-breaking heat scorched the region with highs in the mid-to-upper 90s for a second straight day. The heat and humidity continue into Friday, but a cold front sweeps through the region late in the day, potentially triggering a line of heavy thunderstorms. Somewhat cooler, less humid air spills into the region by early Saturday.

Through Tonight: A very warm, muggy overnight. Skies are partly cloudy and lows only drop to the lower 70s in the cooler suburbs to the upper 70s downtown. Isolated thunderstorms should remain well to the west and southwest of the metro region, out towards the Blue Ridge. Winds are light from the south.

Friday: It’s still plenty hot, but partly to mostly cloudy skies hold high temperatures a few degrees below levels of the previous two days. Highs reach the low-to-mid 90s. Showers and thunderstorms are likely to develop during the afternoon hours from west to east. Heavy downpours and lightning are a good bet. The Storm Prediction Center indicates a slight risk of severe storms capable of producing damaging winds. The most likely timing for storms is from the mid-afternoon through early evening. We will have more on this potential tomorrow.

See David Streit’s forecast through the weekend. And if you haven’t already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. For related traffic news, check out Dr. Gridlock.

Pollen: Trees are LOW, grasses are MODERATE, mold is MODERATE, and weeds are LOW-MODERATE.

CWG to help emcee battle of bands charity event tonight: Tonight - starting at 7:30 p.m. at Black Cat in the District - 16 bands made up of mostly attorneys from area law firms will battle for the charity Gifts for the Homeless. Several CWG contributors will be on hand to help emcee the event. Please come out and support this worthy cause. More from the Going out Gurus: Law firm bands to battle it out for charity at Banding Together

Jason is the Washington Post’s weather editor and Capital Weather Gang's chief meteorologist. He earned a master's degree in atmospheric science, and spent 10 years as a climate change science analyst for the U.S. government. He holds the Digital Seal of Approval from the National Weather Association.


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