THE POST FANS were first.

It was the readers of The Washington Post who, of course, first enjoyed and embraced “Richard’s Poor Almanac,” Richard Thompson’s weekly comic that debuted in 1997 and ran in the Style section. The feature won a national following, combining the wry whimsy and exquisite artwork of a now-acknowledged cartoon genius during its decade-plus run.


. (Richard Thompson/The Washington Post)

“I’m pleased and proud that GoComics is rerunning ‘Richard’s Poor Almanac,’ “ Thompson tells Comic Riffs over the weekend. Whole new generations of comics fans will now have access to my stale, dated juvenilia.”

It was “Richard’s Poor Almanac,” of course — specifically the Bush inaugural cartoon “Make the Pie Higher” — that caught the eye of Andrews McMeel editors and led to the syndication in 2007 of Thompson’s daily strip “Cul de Sac.”

Thompson ended “Richard’s Poor Almanac” a short time later. “Cul de Sac” ran till this past fall, when Thompson ended the Reuben Award-winning strip, citing his efforts to battle Parkinson’s disease.

Among “Richard’s Poor Almanac’s” many fans was the Pulitzer-winning political-cartooning legend Pat Oliphant, who wrote the foreword for the 2004 collection “Richard’s Poor Almanac: 12 Months of Misinformation in Handy Cartoon Form.”

[THE POST MAGAZINE PROFILE: Thompson battles what ails his industry — and his body — with characteristic wit]

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(RICHARD THOMPSON/The Washington Post)