The Washington Post

Police: Student in Laurel committed to hospital after threat to ‘possibly shoot and kill others’

A Laurel High School student was committed to a hospital for mental health care after he made what city police considered a “credible threat” to “possibly shoot and kill others,” authorities said.

Laurel City police spokesman Pete Piringer said investigators found “notes and lists and diagrams and things like that” in the student’s locker that “gave credibility to” the threats, though he declined to say what those threats were specifically or what the materials detailed.

Investigators also believe the student had “access to weapons,” though he declined to say how,” Piringer said. He said police had not seized any weapons in the case.

“The police chief believes that a pretty potentially dangerous situation was prevented,” said Piringer.

But Briant Coleman, a Prince George's County schools spokesman, said that to his knowledge, "There are no threats against any of our students," though school officials were working with Laurel police.

Coleman said that on Monday, students at Laurel High School told a teacher about "concerns" they had about a peer, and that teacher relayed their concerns to the school's principal and school resource officer, and the school's principal and school resource officer reached out to the boy's parents.

Coleman said the school's principal was contacting parents Tuesday night to inform them of what had happened. He added that a letter would be sent home on Wednesday, after school officials gathered more details.

No identifying information about the student, including his age, was reported.

It was not clear when the possible threats were first made.

Piringer said the student was not at school on Monday when investigators had him committed to a hospital for mental health care. He said police were in contact with the student’s parents and considered the case a “classic example of ‘See something, say something.”

This item has been updated.

Matt Zapotosky covers the federal district courthouse in Alexandria, where he tries to break news from a windowless office in which he is not allowed to bring his cell phone.


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