The Washington Post

MWAA board meets to talk travel, ethics reforms

The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority is meeting Wednesday to discuss a series of reforms it hopes will help repair its scandal-plagued image.

MWAA, which is charged with overseeing construction of the $5.6 billion Silver Line rail project, which will provide a critical link to Dulles Airport, has been reeling from charges of questionable spending and cronyism in contracting.

Board members have been criticized for taking expensive trips to far-flung destinations including Prague and Hawaii and spending lavishly on expensive wine and dinners. It has also come under scrutiny for awarding several no-bid contracts to former board members and for hiring an ex-board member for a $180,000-a-year job the day after she stepped down from the board.

At the Wednesday meeting, the board is expected to pass revised travel policies that will discourage first-class travel and limit the amount that can be spent on meals. Board members who wish to drink alcohol will now have to pay for it themselves.

The board will also discuss new ethics policies which will likely place limits on the hiring of former board members as consultants and will require board members to be more proactive about disclosing potential conflicts of interest.

Get updates from the meeting on Twitter from Dr. Gridlock.

Lori Aratani writes about how people live, work and play in the D.C. region for The Post’s Transportation and Development team.


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