The Washington Post

The week ahead: sports crowds, road work, transit meetings

A District Department of Transportation road crew can go through a lot of shoes working on Potholepalooza. (Robert Thomson/The Washington Post)

Travelers will find the temperature cooler than normal this week, but there are just a few chances for showers, the Capital Weather Gang says.

The Nationals are home all week. Most of the weekday games at Nationals Park are at night, but on Wednesday, the game is set for 1:05 p.m. The Capitals play at Verizon Center at 7 pm. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Some road construction projects are starting, and so is the District’s pothole-patching campaign. Also, some meetings are coming up this week that will interest transit riders.

Maine Avenue

Federal highway crews are scheduled to begin work this week on rebuilding Maine Avenue SW between the 14th Street Bridge and Independence Avenue, including the Tidal Basin parking lot.

The project will affect traffic intersecting Maine Avenue from 15th Street SW, Ohio Drive, the Jefferson Memorial and the ramp to southbound Interstate 395. Work, scheduled to continue till early summer, includes milling out asphalt, repairing the base concrete and repaving. Watch out for uneven lanes during the work. There will be lane closings for the project, but all lanes will be open during rush hours.

D.C. Potholepalooza campaign

D.C. Mayor Vincent C. Gray is launching the city’s annual pothole-filling campaign on Monday. During the campaign, dubbed Potholepalooza, the District Department of Transportation gets very aggressive about seeking out damaged sections of roadways and responding to people’s complaints about others.

Through May 22, city residents and commuters can call the District’s 311 line, use the online version of 311 or send e-mails to to nominate their candidates for repairs. During this period, crews try to make the repairs within 48 hours of the complaint. Use this link to track repairs.

Capital Beltway night work

Lanes on the Capital Beltway’s inner loop are scheduled to close between exit 23 (Kenilworth Avenue) and exit 22 (the Baltimore-Washington Parkway) for bridge repairs from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. Monday through Thursday nights. Single-lane closings will begin at 9 p.m., followed by double-lane closings at 10 p.m.

Freeway lane closings

The District Department of Transportation is scheduled to wrap up a series of bridge and tunnel inspections this week. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, watch for lane closings on the ramp from southbound Interstate 395 to the eastbound Southeast-Southwest Freeway, followed by a left lane closing of the I-395 exit from the eastbound freeway to the Mall tunnel.

Metro riders’ sound-off session

The Metro Riders’ Advisory Council has scheduled the first of three listening sessions with the public for Wednesday night. The council says the two-hour session starting at 6:30 p.m. will be an open dialogue with its members about Metro service. The location is the Charles Houston Recreation Center, 901 Wythe St., Alexandria.

Connector buses

Managers of the Fairfax Connector bus system plan to hold three more meetings this  week on the revised routes that will take travelers to the new Silver Line stations. These sessions are all 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.:

■Monday, Westbriar Elementary School, 1741 Pine Valley Dr., Vienna.

■Tuesday, McLean High School, 1633 Davidson Rd., McLean.

■Wednesday, Tysons-Pimmit Regional Library, 7584 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church.

Road diet

The Virginia Department of Transportation is putting part of Oak Street in the Dunn Loring area on a diet. Traffic engineers sometimes redesign roads to attack speeding and improve safety. Drivers who use Lawyers Road or Soapstone Road in Reston will recognize this treatment.

Oak Street this month is losing two of its four through lanes. “By taking away the second travel lane in each direction, we make room for left-turn lanes, dedicated bike lanes, and on-street parking,” VDOT traffic engineer Randy Dittberner said in a statement. “All these features will help eliminate the most extreme speeders and improve safety for drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians.”

Street Smart campaign

This spring’s Street Smart law enforcement campaign continues through May 13. Across the D.C. region, officers will be paying special attention to traffic law violations. They pay special attention to crosswalk violations by motorists and cyclists, as well as to jaywalking pedestrians. Fines range from $40 to $500, depending on the type of the violation, and drivers can lose points.

I-395 HOV lanes

At 11 p.m. Friday, the Virginia Department of Transportation plans to close the high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-395/95 from the D.C. line to their end in Dumfries (Route 234). On Saturday, April 27, at 10 a.m. the HOV lanes will re-open southbound from the Springfield interchange to Dumfries.

The HOV northern section between the D.C. line and the Springfield interchange will remain closed until 4 p.m. Sunday, when all HOV lanes will open northbound. In addition to the HOV closing, VDOT will close one left lane on I-395 South between Seminary Road and the Capital Beltway from 11 p.m. Friday to 9 a.m. Saturday and again from 9 p.m. Saturday to 10 a.m. Sunday.

Crews will be working on the 95 Express Lanes project.

 Metro’s weekend

Weekend maintenance projects will affect all Metrorail lines from 10 p.m. Friday through the system’s midnight closing Sunday, but the main event will be on the Red Line.

Free shuttle buses will replace trains between NoMa-Gallaudet U and Takoma. The Rhode Island, Brookland, and Red Line platform of the Fort Totten station are scheduled to be closed. In the station work zones, crews will be putting new sections of tile on the platforms and making other repairs.

On Sunday, Metrorail will open at 5 a.m. (two hours early) for the Nike Women Half Marathon. The race begins at 7 a.m. on Pennsylvania Avenue NW at 10th Street. See a course map. The nearest stations to the start are Federal Triangle, Metro Center and Archives. (The event organizers pay for the extra service.)

Robert Thomson is The Washington Post’s “Dr. Gridlock.” He answers travelers’ questions, listens to their complaints and shares their pain on the roads, trains and buses in the Washington region.



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