The Washington Post

Higher fines for speeding in the District

One of the District's most profitable speed enforcement cameras on K Street. Bill O'Leary/Washington Post One of the District’s most profitable speed-enforcement cameras, on K Street (Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

It’s a new fiscal year in the District and with that comes some changes. Fines for certain traffic violations are decreasing (failure to come to a complete stop before turning) while others are increasing (going 11 to 15 miles over the speed limit). Here’s a primer, courtesy of the District Department of Motor Vehicles.

Starting October 1, 2013, some photo enforcement, moving violation and parking fines will increase or decrease based on the FY14 Budget Support Act.  The changes are as follows:

  • Speeding 11-15 mph will increase to $100 from $92.
  • Speeding from 16 to 20 mph will increase to $150 from $100.
  • Speeding from 21 to 25 mph will increase to $200 from $150.
  • Failure to come to a complete stop before making a turn will decrease to $50 from $100.
  • A street sweeping violation will be $45.

Bottom line: Slow down.

Note: D.C. Council members Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3) and Tommy Wells (D- Ward 6) convened a task force that examined fines for certain traffic violations in the District. Both said in interviews that it was important that fines not be excessive. But the two also wanted the fines to be structured in a way that discouraged unsafe driving. That’s part of the reason that the faster you go, the more you’ll end up paying.

Over the next few months, District officials will be adding a host of new traffic-enforcement cameras designed to catch not just speeders, but drivers who run through crosswalks and stop signs. So beware.

Also via the DMV: As of Oct. 1, 2013, all ticket fines, penalties and fees must be paid before a boot is removed from a vehicle or a vehicle is released from impoundment. Before this change, the vehicle owner was responsible for paying only fines and fees associated with the tag number of the vehicle that was booted or impounded.


Lori Aratani writes about how people live, work and play in the D.C. region for The Post’s Transportation and Development team.



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