The Washington Post

Amtrak CEO touts record ridership for FY 2013

A woman and child prepare to board an Acela train. (Nikki Kahn — The Washington Post) A woman and child prepare to board an Acela train. (Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post)

Amtrak carried a record 31.6 million passengers in fiscal year 2013  with ridership on the Northeast Corridor posting its second best year ever, officials with the railway system said Monday.

Ridership for all Northeast Corridor services reached 11.4 million. Officials said despite problems following Hurricane Sandy, the Northeast Regional service set a new record.

“We’ve set another ridership and ticket revenue record,” said Joe Boardman, Amtrak’s president and CEO. “We’ve been growing no matter what’s been happening with the economy because we’ve been meeting the needs of travelers on the Northeast Corridor.”

Boardman said that despite the government shutdown, Amtrak plans to continue running full service. He said that ticket revenue increased to a record $2.1 billion.

Since Boardman took the helm of Amtrak in 2009, he said ridership has grown by 16 percent and ticket revenue has grown by 31 percent. This is the ninth time in 10 years the system has set a passenger record.

“We continued to improve our revenue and actually have depended less on federal operating assistance as we have in past,” Boardman said, but he added that federal support is still needed to aid the railway system with infrastructure improvements.

Lori Aratani writes about how people live, work and play in the D.C. region for The Post’s Transportation and Development team.



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Lori Aratani · October 14, 2013

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