The Washington Post

Aaron Hernandez extension further clouds Wes Welker’s future with Patriots


Tight ends Aaron Hernandez (81) and Rob Gronkowski (87) will be in New England for the foreseeable future. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Earlier this summer the team extended Pro Bowl tight end Rob Gronkowski through 2019 with a deal worth a maximum of $55 million.

Combined, the two deals signal a massive investment in the two young tight ends while only further complicating the status of Wes Welker.

Welker, who led the NFL in receptions (122) and the Patriots in receiving yards (1,569) by a large margin last season, contemplated holding out in the spring before he signed his one-year, $9.5 million tender as the team’s franchise player in May.

Asked about his reaction to the Hernandez deal, Welker remained upbeat.


So where does this leave me? (Elise Amendola/AP)

Hernandez has certainly pulled his weight for one of the league’s most high-octane passing offenses. In 14 games last season he caught 79 passes for 910 yards and seven touchdowns. Gronkowski set a tight end record with 17 touchdowns and hauled in 90 passes for 1,327 yards. Tom Brady targeted his two biggest receivers a combined 237 in all.

But Welker was still his preferred target. The 31-year-old was targeted a league-high 172 times — a 50-target increase from 2010 when the two tight ends were a far less significant part of the offense. Welker has led the Patriots in targets, receptions and yards in each of the last four seasons.

The numbers speak for themselves, and if Brady has as much pull in with management as many believe he does, you have to figure he’ll strongly encourage the team to re-up Welker when his contract runs out at the end of the season. And while Welker’s prospects for a long-term extension of his own just took a hit, he’s hoping everything will work itself out after the season.

“I’m under contract. I played out my last deal,” Welker said. “I’ll play out this one and see where we’re at.”

If the Patriots do not give Welker an extension before next summer, they could franchise him again for $11.4 million, but the receiver might not be as willing to sign his tender the second time around.

Follow us: @MattBrooksWP | @CindyBoren

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Welker signs franchise tender, gives up leverage for long-term deal

Welker’s ‘100 times out of 100’ drop proves costly for Patriots

Matt Brooks is the high school sports editor for The Washington Post. He's an Arlington native and longtime District resident and was previously a high school sports reporter, editor for several blogs and Early Lead contributor with The Post.

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