Seeking to inject new life into his struggling presidential bid, Rick Santorum on Thursday took his campaign to Jelly Belly headquarters in California, where he delivered an homage to famed jelly-bean aficionado Ronald Reagan as well as a harsh critique of President Obama, whose foreign policy the former Pennsylvania senator argued has been harmful to the United States.

Obama’s policies are “destructive for our economy, destructive for our reputation around the world and for our national security,” Santorum told supporters at the Fairfield, Calif., headquarters of the jelly-bean manufacturer.

A presidential campaign that has been largely waged on economic grounds shifted to the foreign policy sphere this week after Obama was caught by an open microphone telling Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in Seoul that he needed “space” until after the November election in dealing with the issue of missile defense in Europe.

The contenders for the GOP presidential nod quickly seized upon the episode, arguing that Obama displayed weakness in dealing with Russia and questioning what other matters the president would wield new “flexibility” after the election.

Santorum on Thursday took aim at Obama for “whispering off-camera to the president of Russia” about missile defense, an issue that he said was ironic given Reagan and his legacy with former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev.

“Ronald Reagan didn’t whisper to Gorbachev, ‘Give me some flexibility,’” Santorum said. “He walked out of Iceland and said, ‘You either do this, or we have no deal.’”

Obama had asked Medvedev to “give me a little space, buddy ... then I’ll throw some other of our allies under the bus, in order to get his dream, his dream,” Santorum said.

“And what is that dream?” the former Pennsylvania senator asked. “His dream, in this case, is a nuclear-free world, and he stands here proclaiming that we need to reduce weapons complements between the United States and Russia.”

Santorum also argued that the situation is worse in Afghanistan, where Obama is “buying time” by subscribing to an arbitrary timeline and therefore giving U.S. enemies the one thing they need to survive: Hope.

“Of all of the failings of this administration, of all of the failings, perhaps the greatest is on national security — and folks, that’s saying something,” Santorum said.

He concluded by urging supporters to back his campaign in Wisconsin and elsewhere ahead of Tuesday’s primaries.

“We’re not going to concede to the moderate establishment that it’s over,” he said.