The Washington Post

Media news derivatives: March 16

In case you missed it---Why did the little dispute between the Daily Caller and the Democratic National Committee spill into the public? Seems this could have been handled privately.

Also: Any way the “Daily Show” could discontinue its rants on how the cable networks screw up in their live coverage of the primaries? Is there another bunch of fruit that doesn’t hang this low?

Also also: Politico says voters are stupid, really stupid.


*Here’s a head-scratcher: Reuters writes a “corrected” version of a story about the personal security precautions of Will Lewis, a guy who’s assisting in the internal investigation at News Corp.:

A senior member of the unit Rupert Murdoch created to clean up reporting practices at his British newspapers has consulted a private firm about improving the security system at his home, a spokesman for the official said.

Is all that connected to Lewis’s job as an internal investigator? Maybe not:

“Mr. Lewis has not hired a private security firm to protect his house. He has a normal home security alarm which he has not been happy with for a while,” a spokesman said. “He has requested another firm to provide a quote for an alternative system. They have not yet provided the quote and he has not yet changed the system.”

*Steve Wozniak camps out at a Los Angeles mall, waiting to purchase the iPad 3. Says he’s psyched about the “really high-quality screen.”

*WaPo’s Gene Weingarten riffs: “Publish and perish.”

*Editor at Oregonian fired for passing along a false story. Here’s what happened: Bob Caldwell, a longtime editor at the Oregonian, died on March 10. The Oregonian needed to write a news story on the matter. It wrote this, in part:

“According to a family friend, Caldwell was running errands Saturday afternoon when he didn’t come home as planned. Police apparently found him in his parked car in Washington County and rushed him to a hospital.”

That family friend? That was Oregonian editor Kathleen Glanville. And she wasn’t a very reliable source here. As it turns out, she knowingly contributed to a false story about the death of Caldwell. Just how false was the information? Well, here’s the Oregonian’s correction on the matter:

Bob Caldwell, editor of The Oregonian’s editorial pages, was in the Tigard apartment of a 23-year-old woman when he went into cardiac arrest Saturday afternoon.

The woman called 9-1-1 at 4:43 p.m. to report that Caldwell, 63, was coughing and then unresponsive after a sex act.

The story goes on to say that “The Oregonian previously erroneously reported that Caldwell had been found in his parked car on Saturday, based on information from a family friend.”

So Glanville: Why didn’t she just say that she had no good information?

*”The Daily Show” tackles UNESCO funding cut-off — via enterprise journalism.

*MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow squares off against Sen. Jim Inhofe:

Visit for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.


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