The New York Times building. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

In a statement yesterday, the New York Times sought to mitigate the impact of some “inappropriate” behavior by an unnamed reporter. As reported on Twitter by model Emily Ratajkowski, this reporter said something un-reportorial at a New York Fashion Week event on Sunday night.

While the identity of the guilty reporter was unknown, the newspaper issued a statement: “At a party last night, a Times reporter who does not cover Washington or politics, referred to an unfounded rumor regarding Melania Trump. The comment was not intended to be public, but it was nonetheless completely inappropriate and should not have occurred. Editors have talked to the reporter in question about the lapse.”

Bolding added for a reason. Today, the reporter outed himself on Twitter with these posts:

According to his Twitter bio, Bernstein is a “New York Times features writer, documentary filmmaker, and persistent crank.” Here’s his archival page at the New York Times. The oeuvre is consistent with the charge of a Styles reporter at the New York Times. There’s this recent piece on a former editor of Allure; there’s this piece on Madonna and Marilyn Minter; there’s this piece on the making of “The Godfather.” And there’s a great deal of other coverage that’s a world removed from politics and Washington.

Yet worlds have a way of merging. Back in December, Bernstein co-bylined a story with the headline “Will Ivanka Trump Be the Most Powerful First Daughter in History?” The story examined the controversial stances of Ivanka’s father and how they’d likely affect her business ventures, among other things. Bernstein also tapped out a story on the falloff in interest in Trump buildings; a piece on Ivana Trump (the first wife of Donald Trump); a piece about planning the Trump inauguration; and a double-byline money-and-politics story relating to the early stages of Sen. Ted Cruz’s (R-Tex.) presidential campaign. He also contributed to an April 2016 profile of Ivanka Trump.

So instead of this formulation: “At a party last night, a Times reporter who does not cover Washington or politics referred to an unfounded rumor regarding Melania Trump.”

Perhaps the New York Times should have chosen this formulation: “At a party last night, a Times reporter who has done extensive reporting on the Trump family referred to an unfounded rumor regarding Melania Trump.”

Yes, Bernstein doesn’t “cover” Washington or politics, except when his beat crosses paths with Washington or politics, which happens frequently enough to raise a further question: Just what was he thinking? We’ve left a message for him.