Sean Hannity of Fox News. (Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press)

Twitter users unaware that Sean Hannity, famous prime-time anchor at Fox News, is a petty and tendentious troll got a clue Tuesday afternoon, thanks to Hannity himself:

Inspiration for this astounding act of self-abnegation came from Tuesday’s international news, when The Post reported that North Korea is now making missile-ready nuclear weapons. And then President Trump threatened North Korea with “fire and fury” and Pyongyang spoke of military strikes against U.S. targets, including Guam. So that saber-rattling, Hannity apparently reasoned, served as grounds for national unity.

On his 10 p.m. program Tuesday, Hannity addressed all aspects of the North Korea war of words, chatting with the likes of Fox News’s Lucas Tomlinson, Newt Gingrich and John Bolton.

And for some extracurricular activity, he chimed in on a report that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) had stated in a Monday event that Trump had little political experience, giving rise to “excessive expectations” about what could be accomplished in Washington. Here’s how he chimed:

There’s a roughly eight-hour gap between the two tweets.

There is one of two possibilities here:

Possibility No. 1: Hannity is such a Trump patsy; so dedicated to picking stupid fights on Twitter; so addicted to uppercase social-media insults; so committed to pursuing anyone on the right who slights Trump; so unbalanced as a public figure, that he couldn’t even meet his own, extremely modest 12-hour commitment to civility.

Possibility No. 2: Hannity is such a Trump patsy; so dedicated to picking stupid fights on Twitter; so addicted to uppercase social-media insults; so committed to pursuing anyone on the right who slights Trump; so unbalanced as a public figure, that he doesn’t even consider calling McConnell a “WEAK, SPINELESS leader” a “petty political disagreement.”

Perhaps he’ll shed some light on this matter on Twitter.

Ted Koppel, a special contributor on CBS' "Sunday Morning", told Fox News host Sean Hannity on Sunday, March 26, that determining 'ideology is more important that facts' is bad for America. (Reuters)