Just as quickly as it entered the international spotlight, hacking group LulzSec announced it was disbanding Saturday.

A LulzSec member told the Associated Press that the group was “bored” and denied that it was stopping its public attacks because of pressure from law enforcement. He did, however, say that some of the chat logs and information about hackers’ identities was correct.

In a release posted to PasteBin, the group said that it was calling it quits 50 days after its first publicized hack, but it released one final package of hacked data as a parting blow.

The data included documents from the game Battlefield Heroes, plus internal documents from AOL and AT&T. According to the Next Web, the release also has evidence that the group hacked the U.S. Navy, the NATO online bookshop and the FBI’s Web site. The files also include a hodgepodge of corporate and other IP addresses, usernames, passwords and other log-ins from Hackforums.net and other, unnamed sites.

In a release posted to PasteBin, the group said that it still believes in the AntiSec movement it worked on with Anonymous, and encouraged other hackers to continue that work.

Finally, we encourage all future #AntiSec enthusiasts to join the AnonOps IRC here: http://t.co/1XLL1Jj and follow @AnonymousIRC for glory!Sat Jun 25 23:53:53 via webThe Lulz Boat
LulzSec

It’s worth noting that simply because the core group is no longer publicizing its attacks, it doesn’t mean that it — or offshoot groups — won’t continue attacking companies and Web sites.

Debate has already sprung up about whether or not the group’s attacks and antics were generally beneficial, because of how they drew awareness to widespread weaknesses in online security.

What do you think? Did LulzSec draw attention to important issues? Or were they simply irresponsible criminals?

Related stories:

LulzSec disbands: A timeline of 50 days of hacks

AntiSec results start rolling in, LulzSec chats exposed

LulzSec, Anonymous team up against the world

Report: Suspected LulzSec hacker arrested in Britain