Zynga is thinking about privacy, mobile and its dependence on Facebook as it files to go public. (Paul Sakuma/AP)

In its paperwork, Zynga gave an interesting snapshot of how the FarmVille maker has grown. It now reaches customers in 166 countries and boasts 60 million daily, active users. The company also actually turned a profit of $90.5 million, unlike other prominent tech companies that have gone public.

The real fun of reading an S-1, of course, is that companies list several possible risk factors that could hold them back. These aren’t necessarily things the company is worried about — the company lists, for example, that it’s located near an earthquake fault zone — but it does show what it’s thinking about.

In Zynga’s case, two of these stick out: the company’s relationship with Facebook and possible privacy legislation.

Facebook’s rule that credits become the mandatory currency in-network goes into effect today, though Zynga complied with that rule in April. Noting how closely the game company is tied to its social networking platform, Zynga said that any other fee structure changes like Credits could harm its business model.

“Facebook receives a greater share of payments made by our players than it did when other payment options were allowed,” the company said.

Noting how closely the game company is tied to its social networking platform, Zynga said that it could also be affected if Facebook changes how it shares personal information or lets users share personal information. In that vein, the company also said privacy legislation may require it to change its policies or its games.

Zynga is also thinking about the future of mobile gaming, mentioning that it will need to market its games on other devices to support “alternative devices and technologies.”

Related stories:

Report: Zynga set to file for IPO this week

LinkedIn IPO hits $9 billion -- a new tech bubble?

Groupon files for IPO