Tom Sietsema says the appealing house-made strawberry cheesecake at Jacques’ Brasserie is “fluffier than the usual wedge, thanks to the inclusion of sour cream.” (Scott Suchman/For the Washington Post) (Scott Suchman/For The Washington Post)

The 30-seat addition has classic wicker bistro chairs and “a single mirror, which gives the intimate space the illusion of more size,” Sietsema says. (Scott Suchman/For The Washington Post)


The brasserie can replace the meat in the choucroute platter meat with seafood, such as smoked trout, salmon or rockfish. (Scott Suchman/For The Washington Post)


Owner Jacques Haeringer sits at one of tile-topped tables at his new restaurant. (Scott Suchman/For The Washington Post)


“An entree of trout showered with slivered almonds is decorated with a garden of accessories — pared carrots, zucchini, potatoes and a wisp of puff pastry — that reflect a classical French sensibility of the sort you rarely see outside of a 1960s-era Time-Life ‘Foods of the World’ cookbook,” Sietsema says. (Scott Suchman/For The Washington Post)