The Washington Post

What your name says about your politics

What’s in a name? In an era of microtargeting, slicing and dicing lists of voters and their political habits, the answer might be: More than we think. At least that’s what the Democratic modeling and analytic firm Clarity Campaign Labs has found. The company used data from party voter files across the country to check out how first names correlate with voting habits, and they came up with a fantastic — and fantastically addictive — tool to play with.

Take, oh I don’t know, Reid. Not a terribly common first name — there are only 12,602 registered voters named Reid around the nation. Clarity found 54.7 percent of them are registered Republicans, while 45.3 percent are registered Democrats. Almost 60 percent of us have a college degree, and 47.3 percent have a gun in their home.

You know you want to check your own name. Do it here:

RELATED: 25 maps and charts that explain America right now

Reid Wilson covers national politics and Congress for The Washington Post. He is the author of Read In, The Post’s morning tip sheet on politics.

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