The Washington Post

Gov. Scott Walker dismisses allegations of campaign law violations

 

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) on Friday rejected the allegation in a document released a day earlier that he violated campaign law two years ago.

“This is a prime example of what happens when you take on the big government special interests,” he said in an interview on the Fox News Channel’s Fox & Friends on Friday. “They’re looking for ways to come at us. They’ll continue to do it. They did it two years ago in the recall election, they’re going to do it again now. We’ve got another tough election this fall and so they’re going to come at it with just about everything out there and the media—at least many in the media—are willing accomplices to this. But the facts of the case are pretty clear.”

The documents released Thursday but filed in December allege that Walker was part of a broad scheme to coordinate the activities of groups that spent millions to help him and other Republicans fend off state recall elections. The filing was made in a case shut down last month by a federal judge who found that there was no coordination because the outside groups were not engaged in explicit political activity.

“The accusation of any wrongdoing written in the complaint by the office of a partisan Democrat District Attorney by me or by my campaign is categorically false,” Walker said in a late-Thursday statement. “In fact two judges, in both state and federal courts, have ruled that no laws were broken.”

He repeated his dismissal of the allegation and criticism of the media on Twitter Thursday night and Friday morning.

Niraj Chokshi is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post.

The Freddie Gray case

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!

Campaign 2016 Email Updates

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!
Comments
Show Comments
The Republicans debate Saturday night. The New Hampshire primary is on Feb. 9. Get caught up on the race.
Heading into the next debate...
Donald Trump returns to the Republican presidential debate stage Saturday night. Marco Rubio arrives as a sudden star, but fending off ferocious attacks from his rivals. Still glowing from his Iowa victory, Ted Cruz is trying to consolidate conservative support, while Ben Carson is struggling to avoid being typecast as the dead man walking.
Listen
Play Video
New Hampshire polling averages
Donald Trump holds a commanding lead in the next state to vote.
New Hampshire polling averages
Polling in New Hampshire has typically been volatile after Iowa's caucuses, but Bernie Sanders, from its neighboring state Vermont, has been holding a lead over Hillary Clinton.
55% 38%
Listen
Play Video
Upcoming debates
Feb. 6: GOP debate

on ABC News, in Manchester, N.H.

Feb. 11: Democratic debate

on PBS, in Wisconsin

Feb 13: GOP debate

on CBS News, in South Carolina

Campaign 2016
State of the race

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.