The Washington Post

Map: Fireworks laws in every state


(Niraj Chokshi, data from Consumer Product Safety Commission)

Roughly 1 in 9 Americans lives in a state that bans all consumer fireworks, including those not blocked by federal regulations.

Four states had blanket bans on consumer fireworks as of June 1, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which sets federal firework regulations. Those states are Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York. Those states are home to 11.4 percent of the population.

Consumer fireworks include shells and mortars, Roman candles, rockets, sparklers, firecrackers with no more than 50 milligrams of powder, and novelty items, such as snakes, airplanes, ground spinners, helicopters, fountains, and party poppers, according to CPSC.

Five states — Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Ohio and Vermont — allow only sparklers and/or novelty fireworks. And Arizona allows only novelty fireworks. The remaining 40 states allow some or all consumer fireworks.

About 11,400 people were treated at hospital emergency rooms for fireworks-related injuries last summer, according to CPSC estimates, with about 65 percent believed to have occurred from June 21 to July 21. More than half the injuries were burns, and most involved the head, hands, fingers and legs. An estimated 40 percent of those injured were children younger than 15 years old, the CPSC said.

(Click here to view a larger version of the map above.)

Niraj Chokshi is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post.

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