More than a third of all candidates in state legislative races this year ran unopposed in the general election, according to data collected by the National Institute on Money in State Politics.

In the 46 states with legislative elections last month, 36 percent of races were uncontested. Georgia was the biggest offender, with 80 percent of races having a single candidate running for office, followed by South Carolina with 72 percent and Wyoming with 64 percent.

Percentage of state legislative races in 2014 that were uncontested

These latest figures represent a 9 percent increase from the last midterms in 2010 and the highest percentage for an election since 2000.

“Elections are usually about choices: choices between platforms, choices between parties, choices between personalities,” the the National Institute on Money in State Politics wrote. “Yet voters don’t always have a choice when they go to the polls.”

The group found that term limits had an effect on whether states had a large number of unopposed races. Georgia does not have term limits, while Michigan, where no races were uncontested, and California, where 4 percent of races were, do have term limits.

Arkansas and Oklahoma, which do have term limits, however, still had a high percentage of uncontested races. Hawaii, which does not have term limits but doesn’t require candidates who win a primary and face no general election opponent to advance to a general election, had no uncontested races.

Percentage of state legislative races in 2014 that were uncontested

Of the 14 states with legislative term limits, nine had less than a quarter of races that were uncontested.