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Clinton, Santorum, Kerry, Powell and Coburn were cute kids

Not many issues could create an alliance of Hillary Clinton, Rick Santorum, John Kerry, Colin Powell and Tom Coburn.

But a global health initiative to help children survive beyond their 5th birthday is a cause without a political party identification.

To celebrate a marked decline in deaths among young children over the past two decades, a coalition called “5th Birthday and Beyond” is highlighting several events next week in Washington. Among them is a concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion aimed at engaging millennials hosted by Global Citizen, a meeting with international health leaders at USAID and a reception honoring former and current leadership of the House and Senate State and Foreign Operations Appropriations subcommittees who designated funds for children’s health and survival.

Despite the cut-not-spend mantra that has ruled Capitol Hill for the past four years, funding for global health has remained intact, even increasing:

(Courtesy: Kaiser Family Foundation)
(Kaiser Family Foundation)

Former secretaries of state Clinton (D) and Powell (R), former senator Santorum (R-Pa.), current Secretary of State Kerry (D) and Sen. Coburn (R-Okla.) are among the individuals who have sent the coalition pictures of themselves at 5 years old as part of a social media campaign to raise awareness for the cause. The group is hoping that the politicians, and others, will also change their social media profile pictures to the images of themselves as youngsters.

Word is Bill Gates, whose foundation is part of the coalition, has agreed to change his and tweet a message of support to his 16 million followers.

No matter how you feel about them as grown-ups, the participating politicians were pretty cute kids.

Hillary Clinton


(Courtesy: 5th Birthday and Beyond Coalition)

Rick Santorum

(Courtesy: West End Strategy)
(Courtesy: 5th Birthday and Beyond Coalition)

 

John Kerry

(Courtesy: West End Strategy)
(Courtesy: 5th Birthday and Beyond Coalition)

Colin Powell

(Courtesy: West End Strategy)
(Courtesy: 5th Birthday and Beyond Coalition)

Tom Coburn

(Courtesy: West End Strategy)
(Courtesy: 5th Birthday and Beyond Coalition)
Colby Itkowitz is the lead anchor of the Inspired Life blog. She previously covered the quirks of national politics and the federal government.

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