The Washington Post

Showdown on Memorial Bridge?

Lanier says armed police will prevent rifle-carrying protesters from entering the District. (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)

The District of Columbia is no stranger to civil disobedience, to protesters who break the law to make a point. But never have the protests involved more than 2,000 loaded rifles. So you can understand the anxiety many are feeling after activist and radio host Adam Kokesh — best known in these parts for dancing at the Jefferson Memorial — announced his “Open Carry March,” a protest against government “tyranny” featuring gun-toting protesters marching across the Memorial Bridge into D.C. And you can understand the even greater anxiety after Police Chief Cathy Lanier said Tuesday there’s a “pretty good chance” her officers will meet the protesters on the bridge. “If you’re coming here to protest government policy, great,” she said on NewsChannel 8. “If you’re coming here to break the law, we’ll take action.”

In other news:

His murder trial delayed till December, Albrecht Muth starts eating again (Post)

Fire chief says training academy harassment wasn’t sexual; cadet begs to differ (WJLA-TV)

“In this city, progressive has become code for young and mostly white” (Blade op-ed)

D.C. Housing Authority is sued by deaf clients, who say the agency has repeatedly failed to provide interpreters (Post)

Council passes supplemental budget after beefing up summer school (PostExaminer)

Tommy Wells aims to ban guns made by “3D printers” (PostExaminerWaTimes)

Truancy bill passes first vote (WAMU-FM)

The Jeffrey Thompson document fight has likely slowed the Vincent Gray campaign investigation to a standstill (Examiner column)

Tourist visits to D.C. reach record 18.9 million in 2012 (AP)

Metro union is starting to push back on expansion of Circulator buses (WJLA-TV)

Former deputy mayor among Gray appointees to Public Charter School Board (Post)

DDOT officials show off M Street cycletrack plans (WAMU-FMWashingtonianDCist)

Street-naming push prompts debate over Bulgaria’s Holocaust legacy (AP)

Injured cop who waited too long for ambulance leaves hospital (WRC-TV)

Feds nab Fourth District cop for laundering drug money (PostWRC-TVAP)

Washington Monument scaffold will get fabric and lighting (WJLA-TV)

Teen gets seven years for beating elderly Chevy Chase woman, who has since died (Post)

Mixed-use moves farther down the Green Line: 446,000 square feet planned for Congress Heights Metro (WBJ)

Why D.C. United land swap is a good idea (GGW)

Why D.C. United land swap is a bad idea (RPUS)

DCPS won’t restore cuts to Fillmore Arts Center (Current via Dish)

Shocker: Wisconsin Avenue streetlights might not be optimized for Montgomery County commuters (WRC-TV)

Some affordable housing programs work faster than others (DCFPI)

Where the “reverse commuters” go (Housing Complex)

First public hearings Monday on potential Height Act modifications (WBJ)

Hizzoner is grilled by Eliot-Hine Middle School’s young radio hosts (WJLA-TV)

The crossing guard who makes everyone smile (Post column)

The bartender who builds schools (Post column)

Mike DeBonis covers Congress and national politics for The Washington Post. He previously covered D.C. politics and government from 2007 to 2015.



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Mike DeBonis · May 7, 2013

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