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The most frequent flier

Martha Rigsby, the most frequent 911 caller in the city’s history, leaves D.C. Superior Court on Wednesday. (Mark Gail/ The Washington Post)

The problem of “frequent fliers” is not a new one for the city’s emergency responders. A small group of serial 911 callers have long consumed a disproportionate share of D.C. Fire and EMS time and resources. But, the Post’s Amy Brittain reports, the city is taking court action against one of the most frequent of frequent fliers, seeking to have a guardian appointed for Martha Rigsby, 58, who in the past year alone has “accounted for 226 calls to 911 and been whisked by an ambulance to a hospital 117 times.” The Trinidad resident has racked up a $61,000 bill for ambulance rides but has also put herself in danger, a city psychiatrist testified, “from falls under the claim of ‘seizures’ or ‘Narcolepsy,’ which have never been correlated with medical findings.” Rigsby is fighting the guardianship petition in court and addressed her frequent calls for help after a recent hearing: “Well, I don’t do it on purpose,” she said.

In other news:

Vincent Orange and Andy Shallal pick up mayoral primary ballot petitions (PostAPWRC-TVWAMU-FMDCistWashingtonianLoose LipsWBJ)

Yes, Eleanor Holmes Norton is running again (WTOP)

Despite rising test scores, achievement gap persists in D.C.’s public schools (Post)

School leaders variously credit teaching, curriculum, choice for gains (WAMU-FM)

Or is it simply gentrification? (GGW)

Eight of 68 charter schools are ranked in failing Tier 3 (PostWAMU-FM)

What can be done to improve care inside “the city’s largest mental health institution” — the D.C. jail? (Post)

“It’s troubling that it took four suicides and 165 attempts for officials to realize they had a problem” (Post editorial)

The nation’s largest agglomeration of “super ZIPs” touches on the western half of D.C. (Post)

Study of minimum wage hike needed to “produce the most benefit and do the least harm” (Post editorial)

Only five D.C. residents have completed their insurance purchase on the D.C. health exchange — but, hey, what’s the rush? (WonkblogWBJAP)

Plans for 10-screen NoMa multiplex herald a new movie theater boom (Capital Business)

On the 11th Street Bridge project, a small group of D.C. residents have learned the ins and outs of construction management (Post)

Kojo Nnamdi loves him some politics: “It’s part of the air we breathe” (Washingtonian)

Council members are “scared of this moment when there is going to be an attorney general” (WAMU-FM)

Gabe Klein says D.C. government “has been a little bit stuck because of the issues swirling around it” (Washingtonian)

Maudine Cooper is toasted upon her retirement as Greater Washington Urban League head (WRC-TV)

Gray uses weekly radio address to tout NAEP scores (WNEW-FM)

What’s the best way to determine which D.C. schoolkids are “at-risk”? (DCFPI)

Former D.C. jail doctor sentenced to five years for sexually assaulting inmate (PostWUSA-TV)

Family of Navy Yard shooting victim sues federal agencies for negligence (Post)

Bad traffic kept Capitol Police tactical unit away from the Navy Yard shooting scene, report finds (AP)

Maryland man charged with murder after allegedly striking and killing 24-year-old pedestrian while speeding down Benning Road (PostWTOP)

Woman struck and killed outside Marine Barracks was longtime cafeteria worker there (Post)

Man, 27, found shot to death early Friday outside Nalle Elementary in Marshall Heights (Post)

Which thoroughfare will the north-south streetcar line ply? (Housing Complex)

Cleveland Parkers even oppose pilot program testing service lane alternatives (WAMU-FM)

The streetcar, when it opens, will mean steep learning curve for riders and drivers (Dr. Gridlock)

Repaved 15th Street bike lane already defaced (PoPville)

Unclosely spaced “zebras” haven’t done enough to stop U-turns across Pennsylvania Avenue bike lanes (WAMU-FM)

Narrow the cycletracks, prevent encroaching cars? (GGWWTOP)

A closer look at the Franklin School redevelopment bids (WBJ)

During Southwest Waterfront construction, live-aboards will play musical chairs (UrbanTurf)

Metro’s unwillingness to pay dental bill means veteran Transit Police dog is facing retirement (HuffPo)

The conservative Catholic case against legalizing child surrogacy in the District (Pilot)

Gee, Loudoun County supervisors, it sure is annoying when outside politicians tell you your business (PostWTOPWUSA-TV)

Mike DeBonis covers Congress and national politics for The Washington Post. He previously covered D.C. politics and government from 2007 to 2015.



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Mike DeBonis · November 8, 2013

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