* In case you were wondering where Hillary Clinton stands on the Iran deal:

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s endorsement of the landmark nuclear deal with Iran underscores the deeply tangled links between President Barack Obama’s foreign policy legacy and the presidential aspirations of his former secretary of state.

Between meetings on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, Clinton stressed that the agreement would need to be “enforced vigorously, relentlessly,” noting that Obama called her last night to inform her that a deal had been reached. “As president, I would be absolutely devoted to assuring the agreement is followed.”

It’s almost as if she learned something from the Iraq War.

* Adam Wollner rounds up the reaction to the deal by presidential candidates. Mike Huckabee’s promise to “topple the terrorist Iranian regime” through military force was particularly heartening.

* Matt Duss explains how the Iran agreement is an important step in the long process necessary to end the mindset that got us into the Iraq War.

* Dennis Ross gives a good overview of the outstanding questions the administration still has to answer about the deal.

* Jeffrey Goldberg explains why even those who don’t like the deal should probably accept it.

* Steven Benen marvels at the sight of Jeb Bush calling any negotiation with Iran “appeasement” because you shouldn’t negotiate with regimes “that don’t embrace democratic values.” Funny, his brother negotiated a nuclear deal with Libya, and Saint Ronnie, who walked the earth without sin, did the same with the Soviet Union.

* Here’s Scott Walker’s latest attempt to reach out to struggling Americans:

Scott Walker appeared to take aim at the national minimum wage on Monday evening, referring to it as one of many “lame ideas” pushed by Democrats.

Walker’s comment came in a lengthy interview with Fox News’s Sean Hannity immediately following a speech formally announcing his entrance into the 2016 presidential race. Walker said the next president needs to speak the language of the industrial Midwest and connect with the working class.

“The left claims that they’re for American workers and they’ve just got just really lame ideas — things like the minimum wage,” Walker said. “Instead of focusing on that, we need to talk about how we get people the skills and the education and the qualifications that they need to take on the careers that pay far more than the minimum wage.”

Right, because believing the minimum wage should be higher is the same thing as saying no one should ever earn more than the minimum wage. Just the same.

* Jennifer Rubin pillories Scott Walker for his latest pander to the far right: His declaration that he opposes the Boy Scouts lifting the ban on gay troop leaders because the previous policy “protected children.” — gs

* And Brian Beutler locates the larger meaning of this episode, in the wake of the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage decision: “Republican politicians will still have plenty of opportunities to treat gays and lesbians like aberrant miscreants.” — gs

* Ed Kilgore takes apart the arguments for Scott Walker’s general election viability, and explains why they are increasingly coming across as “boilerplate rhetoric with a distinct aroma of fraud.” — gs

* At The Week, I argued that Scott Walker’s problem is that he’s the most partisan of all the Republicans running for president.

* Progressive groups such as Democracy For America are ramping up the pressure on Hillary Clinton to support reinstating Glass-Steagall, another sign the left is remaining vigilant for any signs of a weak commitment to Wall Street reform. — gs

* Here’s the latest Affordable Care Act ruling:

The Little Sisters of the Poor — nuns who have refused to comply with the Affordable Care Act contraception mandate — lost their latest court case Tuesday (July 14).

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit ruled that the Little Sisters must comply with the law’s requirement that they allow their insurers to offer free contraception coverage to employees.

There is an “accommodation” in the mandate that would allow the sisters to sign a paper that stated their religious objections to the Department of Health and Human Services mandate and thereby allow the insurers to step in with no other involvement by the Catholic sisters. However, the Little Sisters insisted such a letter would still violate their religious convictions because it would enable something they see as wrong to take place.

To be clear, they don’t have to provide contraception coverage. What they object to is having to sign a form saying they don’t want to provide contraception coverage. Seriously, that’s the basis of their lawsuit.

* In the latest USA Today poll, the Republican candidate leading the field (Donald Trump) is also the one who fares worst in a matchup against Hillary Clinton. What does that say about the GOP? Nothing good.

* And finally, this is my favorite article of the day. In response to this piece I wrote last week, Michael Barone wrote a column arguing that the 1988 Bush campaign’s use of Willie Horton had absolutely nothing to do with stirring up racist fears — it was just about their deep interest in prison furlough policy!