President Trump. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

We asked Post readers to tell us the single worst thing they thought President Trump had done since his election one year ago. Then, we invited everyone to vote on whether they agreed or disagreed. We’ve now put together the top ranking submissions from each category, as of Monday, Nov. 6. See what you and your fellow readers chose below, and check out all the responses here. (Voting was not the result of a scientific poll.)

The five worst things Trump has done

5. His decision on transgender troops strikes me as the most repugnant thing that he’s done. He announced in a fit of caprice a decision with apparently no prior thought. Seemingly with the sole goal of mollifying his base, he doubled down on his bigotry and discriminatory practices when called out on them. This isn’t an area that he explicitly staked out as his during the campaign, like his racism or misogyny, but nevertheless he forged ahead in his attempts to denigrate an already persecuted group. (3,613) – Kaleb Pifer, 21, Detroit

4. It’s a challenge to separate the awful things he’s said (Charlottesville, embracing dictators like Vladimir Putin and Rodrigo Duterte) with the awful things he’s actually done or tried to do. But to me the worst thing he’s done has been to show utter disdain for the truth. It started on his first full day in office in front of the CIA wall, and it continues to this day. A representative example would be the bogus “voter fraud” panel that is dangerous in all sorts of ways. (3,675 votes) – Rick Kronberg, 45, Livingston, N.J.

3. He canceled the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would have promoted U.S. trade at the expense of China. But President Trump thinks everything from the Obama administration is bad. (3,680 votes) – Steve Kessler, 61, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

2. The worst thing he’s done to date is the speech he gave at the United Nations. Does he realize that threatening to destroy North Korea would be a war crime? (3,794 votes) – Cathy Carey, 64, Healdsbug, Calif.

1. It’s a tie between normalizing lying and demonizing the press. Both are unforgivable. (4,600 votes) – Maureen Driscoll, 54, Burbank, Calif.