D’Angelo McDade, Trevon Bosley and Arieyanna Williams at the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colo., on June 30. (Jonathan Capehart/The Washington Post)
Opinion writer

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D’Angelo McDade, Arieyanna Williams and Trevon Bosley made a powerful impression at the closing session of the Aspen Ideas Festival on June 30. They were from Chicago and had been victims of gun violence many times over. And they challenged the crowd — and Americans, in general — to give them the same care, attention and resources showered on the Parkland, Fla., kids. In fact, McDade spoke at the March for Our Lives last spring.


Aspen Institute President Daniel Porterfield moderates a discussion on gun violence in Chicago with Trevon Bosley, Arieyanna Williams and D’Angelo McDade during the closing session of the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colo., on June 30. (Jonathan Capehart/The Washington Post)

Then, Williams made a big ask: How many people in this room would actually come to Chicago and spend a day in our neighborhood, because we can make that happen.

Hands quickly flew into the air. Mine included. So many hands. How could they not after such an impassioned and powerful case was made? So my producer Carol Alderman and I flew to Chicago and spent the day with McDade. The date was Aug. 1, one year to the day when he and his family were strafed by gunfire while sitting on their front porch.

LISTEN HERE

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This latest episode of “Cape Up” is different from what you’re used to hearing. This is not a straight interview. Instead, you’re going to hear McDade’s story. I urge you to listen to him and what he has to say, especially to those who raised their hands in that tent in Aspen, Colo.


D’Angelo McDade talks with talks with The Post’s Jonathan Capehart on the “Cape Up” podcast at McDade’s home in Chicago on Aug. 1. (Carol Alderman/The Washington Post)

“Don’t Raise your hand if you’re not going to come. Don’t raise your hand if you’re not going to help me save the next person’s life,” McDade told me. “Don’t raise your hand if you don’t want to help save mine.”

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