The Washington Post

FCC to AT&T: Let’s talk jobs

The Federal Communications Commission has asked AT&T for more information on whether or not its planned acquisition of T-Mobile will result in a net increase of jobs.

“Our review of the information currently in our record suggests that AT&T’s responses on this issue remain incomplete,” the agency wrote in a letter to the company. “Indeed, AT&T to date has produced almost nothing in response” to the question of net job creation.

AT&T and T-Mobile have said that their proposed merger will create “as many as 96,000 jobs” but hasn’t indicated what its net job figures will be, The Washington Post reported

Seeking clarification, wireless communication bureau chief Rick Kaplan has asked AT&T to send estimates of the size of its workforce both “before and as anticipated after the merger.” The agency has also asked AT&T to quantify the “cost synergies” that would result from the merger in the form of payroll reductions or layoffs or other saving related to jobs.

In its own filing, the company said that it will respond fully to the agency’s request.

AT&T also shot back at claims by Public Knowledge and Free Press with its own letter Thursday that the merger is not in the public interest, saying the company has made several job commitments including a plan to offer non-management T-Mobile employees other positions in the company in the event that their jobs are eliminated. It intends to achieve payroll reductions through attrition, the company wrote in an FCC filing.

Several politicians have lent their support to the merger because of the companies’ promises to create jobs and bring back overseas call center jobs that had been outsourced.

Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.

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