The Washington Post

The Circuit: Amazon tablet, competition in a streaming world, privacy

Tablet, iPhone, oh my: Amazon will announce a new product-- expected to be a tablet--today, and Apple sent out its invitations for an event Oct. 4 where it will likely unveil the iPhone 5. The big gadget announcements are adding to a flood of new devices hitting the market as consumers clamor for media via the Web.

Hayley Tsukayama will be in New York City filing live from Amazon’s 10 a.m. event. Follow her at @htsuka and on Faster Forward.

Competing in a multi-streaming world:

Here’s an excerpt from our story today ahead of those device launches.

“With so many gadgets offering television shows and movies, American families are watching more videos than ever — just not necessarily together. The proliferation of Hollywood content in the home reflects the ferocious battle across disparate companies that are all trying to do the same thing: capture eyeballs by offering on-demand shows.

“In this race for consumer attention, retailers such as Wal-Mart are suddenly competing against Netflix, Apple and Google. Last week, Facebook, the world’s most popular Web site, entered the fray. On Wednesday, Amazon is expected to jump in with a new tablet that will allow users to stream its vast catalog of videos.”

P rivacy on the radar: Reps. Ed Markey (D-Mass) and Joe Barton (R-Tex.) have asked the Federal Trade Commission to investigate tracking technology known as “supercookies.” The technology allows sites to track users even after they have deleted regular cookies, according to a Wall Street Journal story.

Facebook is spreading its tentacles, as explained in this New York Times story on how the company’s “like” button may be telling the site, and advertisers, more about you than you think.

The Wall Street Journal is also changing its privacy policy, to allow the site to connect personally identifiable information with Web browsing data without user consent, reports the WSJ’s Julia Angwin.

Patent fueds:

Cnet reports that the The U.S. International Trade Commission have begun an investigation on HTC’s behalf into whether Apple infringes on HTC’s intellectual property with its mobile phones, tablets and computers.

Cecilia Kang is a senior technology correspondent for The Washington Post.



Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read



Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Your Three. Video curated for you.