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White House Correspondents’ Dinner 2014

May 2, 2014

Full coverage from the speeches, parties and red carpet from the Post’s Style reporters.

  • Cara Kelly
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Barbara Walters didn’t know it was called the nerd prom when Washington Post told her. “Who are the nerds? We’re the nerds?” She asked. “Well, I’ve been called worse.”

  • Cara Kelly
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When asked who he wants to take a picture with, the basketball legend responded, “Oh wow, I don’t know. Can’t think of anything of the top of my head.”

And here’s a strange group showing up together: Matthew Morrison, JC Chasez, Tony Romo and Sir Patrick Stewart all arrived in a giant pack, sneaking in the back way to avoid the press at the big press dinner.

(Reporting by Jamie Fuller)

  • Cara Kelly
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Our colleague, TJ Ortenzi, is camped out on the red carpet, decked in Google Glass. Here is a glimpse behind the glass:

  • Cara Kelly
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Did ‘Duck Dynasty’ get more fan fare than ‘Scandal’? Our colleague Jaime Fuller reports the reality show stars were greeted with the most enthusiastic responses so far. Also overheard on the red carpet:

Questions about selfies: 1

Number of selfies requested: 1

Number of questions about vintage eyewear: 1

— T.J. Ortenzi (@tjortenzi) May 3, 2014

  • Cara Kelly
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  • Cara Kelly
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  • Cara Kelly
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  • Emily Heil
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Read more about this year’s emcee, Joel McHale.

Joel McHale (Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Joel McHale (Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

  • Roxanne Roberts
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And now for something completely different: a few Washington celebrities.

Sure, there was the requisite number of Hollywood types at Tammy Haddad’s annual garden brunch Saturday in Georgetown, but there was also a gaggle of Washington names who came … wait for it … to see each other. “This is the only thing I’m going to do,” said Washington businessman Winston Bao Lord. “I can have actual conversation with friends.”

Tammy Haddad (Roxanne Roberts/TWP).

Tammy Haddad (Roxanne Roberts/TWP).

What started more than two decades ago as brunch for 30 has ballooned into a massive curtain-raiser to Saturday night’s dinner – this year’s estimate of 300 guests somehow morphed into 600. “It’s still a party for old friends,” explained Haddad, “and some new ones.” Plenty of the Washington veterans remember when it was little party in Haddad’s backyard, and they still have what we’ll call a sentimental attachment to the event. Plus, they’re pretty sure that they’ll run into a few longtime pals over mimosas. “Remember the old days?” sighed Rhoda Glickman, who was chit-chatting with husband Dan, Roy and Abby Blunt and Debbie Dingell, who took a 24-hour break from her Michigan congressional race to be in town.

We saw Washington bold-faced names happily huddled with each other: Valerie Jarrett, Penny Pritzker, Gene Sperling, Jack Quinn, Bob Barnett, Lloyd Hand, Lucky Roosevelt, Jeremy Bernard, Hillary Rosen, Steve Case, Connie Milstein, Franco Nuschese, Debra Lee, Robert Albritton and Mark Ein, who loaned his R Street mansion for the festivities. “Welcome to my house,” he said with a shrug and a grin.

Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Gene Sperling, Penny Pritzker and Jack Quinn (Roxanne Roberts/TWP).

Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Gene Sperling, Penny Pritzker and Jack Quinn (Roxanne Roberts/TWP).

At a brunch like this, you realize that not everyone attending the correspondents weekend knows or cares about Hollywood. For every crazed fan clamoring for a selfie with an actor, there are still a lot of D.C. folks who didn’t have any idea who, say, that woman in the mint-green pantsuit was. Two guests glanced over at the slightly familiar face until it finally registered: It was former “American Idol” contestant/actress Katharine McPhee.

“ ‘Glee,’ right?” said one. Nope. McPhee starred in the canceled NBC series “Smash” and was now just another random starlet teetering on too-high designer heels at the party. Then again, we’re guessing she probably didn’t recognize the commerce secretary, so it all kind of evens out, doesn’t it?

  • Emily Heil
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“We have some presidents in the room,” announced Tammy Haddad, the host of a Saturday afternoon “garden party” brunch in Georgetown that serves as the warm-up event for many a VIP attending tonight’s White House Correspondents Association Dinner.

She meant, of course, not the actual commander in chief who will headline tonight’s event, but fake presidents — the actors who play POTUS in the proliferating batch of Washington-themed TV shows. There was Tony Goldwyn, who plays the head of household at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on ABC’s “Scandal.” And there was Michael Gill, who portrays the deposed POTUS on Netflix’s “House of Cards.”

“There’s even a vice president here!” Haddad continued. (That would be Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who plays the titular “Veep” on HBO.)

The conflating of real and fake Washington has become a theme of the festivities this weekend surrounding the dinner, with the actors who play the Washington regulars — chiefs of staff, press secretaries, Cabinet members, intelligence officials — mingling with their real-life counterparts.

“Hello, Mr. President,” a uniformed military officer greeted Gill, who offered a handshake instead of a salute.

He was joking, we think.

In the tents behind the grand house that served as the setting for the soiree, there were mimosas, and a bacon bar, and waiters bearing trays of smoothies, which bartenders were generously spiking. Presiding over it all was Haddad, the longtime TV news producer whose title is now ostensibly “media consultant,” though her role is often pulling off events with enviable guest lists.

The brunch, a pre-dinner gathering known around town simply as “Tammy’s brunch,” bears the hallmarks of a Washington party that one would expect from such a pro. First, a storied setting in the Georgetown home that once belonged to Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham, now owned by Washington Kastles owner and businessman Mark Ein.

An all-star lineup of hosts? Yep.

And, of course, a good cause. The fete “honors” two charities: Dog Tag Bakery, a budding chain of eateries that will employ and train disabled veterans; and Blue Star Families, an organization that supports military families. Donations are only suggested, though, and there’s no hard sell. This is brunch, after all, not a shakedown.

And despite the intimate setting and casual dress, there’s no mistaking this for your typical backyard get-together. There’s a live stream of the event, and on her Web site, Haddad has helpfully suggested tweets: “I’m proud to support our troops with @DogTagBakery and @BlueStarFamily at the #GardenBrunch! #WHCDI’m proud to support our troops with @DogTagBakery and @BlueStarFamily at the #GardenBrunch! #WHCD”

Not all the actors there were famous for playing Washington regulars — Diane Lane, for example, (gorgeous but not giving interviews) and Patrick Stewart (ditto). And the thespians weren’t the only ones in attendance. The crowd included media boldfacers Charlie Rose, David Gregory, Chris Matthews, and Ed Henry plus an assortment of other VIPs, including former AOL chairman Steve Case, British Ambassador Peter Westmacott, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.), Rep. Darryl Issa (R-Calif.), and Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.).

  • Emily Heil
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  • Lavanya Ramanathan
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For the journalists and the young D.C. lawyers and their plus-ones who abandoned People/Time and the New Yorker, the New Media party and Google’s shindig, the after-party Friday was ABC Fusion. The bash held by the new media venture aimed at young Hispanics hoisted its many, many banners at a K Street club, where it offered a sombrero (really?) and faux Ray-Bans at the photo booth, and drew mostly Young Washington. The club proved the ideal place to end a night that mostly played out in stuffy ballrooms, but by midnight the crowd had begun to sprawl out on sofas and stare blankly at their phones, to snap their last selfies and post their last tweets (and maybe play a little Words With Friends, from the looks of it). Grammy-winning Latin act Fonseca kept the energy high for as long as it could, but with nowhere to check that 17-pound swag bag from People, the crowd thinned out before the band’s set was done.

  • Helena Andrews-Dyer
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The vibe was relaxed and low-key at the party train’s last stop Friday night. The famous (stars of “Scandal,” “Veep,” “House of Cards” and  “Modern Family,” as well as White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett) and the not-so-famous (pretty much everyone else) wrapped up the night with margaritas (Patron signage abounded) and not-so-many selfies at Funny or Die’s annual fete.

Supposedly off the record, the zoo mentality of the rest of the night had worn off. This was about stars in their natural habitat, mixing, mingling and, in actor Eric Stonestreet’s case, looking for a dance partner who could keep up, without the specter of Instagram hanging over every tipsy decision. (See Stonestreet and the Dougie.)

  • Emily Heil
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Eclectic might be the only way to describe the motley assortment of guests at the party co-sponsored by Google and Netflix.

Celebrity chefs were hanging out on the balcony (Jose Andres bonding with his pal, Richard Wolff; Spike Mendelsohn huddled with a few smokers in a far corner); House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi posed for pictures with 20-something fans. Bellamy Young, the actress who plays the first lady on ABC’s “Scandal” was deep in conversation with Huffington Post’s Howard Fineman.

Journalists. Senators. Hill staffers. Stylish young partiers.

“I think that guy makes juice drinks at my gym,” one party-goer said as he scanned the crowd.

Later in the evening, musician Questlove arrived (of course?), wearing his trademeark heart-shaped pin.

One thing that made the party a standout was a novel location, the soaring, multi-level Institute of Peace, whose all-white interior and sprawling outdoor space overlooking the Lincoln Memorial made for a dramatic backdrop. Even veteran Washington party-goers had never attended a function there.

True to the techy sponsors, there was a “GIF booth” in place of a photobooth, and tablets played YouTube videos at the bars (though it was sort of an odd sensation to watch a hair-styling tutorial while waiting for a cocktail). Even dessert was gadget-centric, with a giant tank of liquid nitrogen mixed into floats and ice cream.

And as midnight approached, at least some of the crowd dispersed. Outside, most of the cast of “Scandal” — who seemed to have hit just about every party in town on Friday – scurried past NBC’s Andrea Mitchell into a waiting black SUV.

Guillermo Díaz, the actor who plays Huck on the ABC show, compared post-party bloat with Katie Lowes, who plays Quinn, his onscreen sort-of love interest. Pushing his stomach out as far as it would go, he demanded that she touch it. “It feels like I’m pregnant,” he announced. “We definitely ate too much.”

  • Veronica Toney
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Off the Record was an intimate White House Correspondents weekend gathering to benefit Rock The Vote. Lani Hay, LMT Inc. CEO and president, hosted the event in her home.

Michelle Branch provided the entertainment with her acoustic set that started with her 2001 hit “Everywhere” and included songs from her country duo, The Wreckers. “On my plane was Kristen Bell and her husband Dax, everyone was talking about what parties they were going to,” she said. But Branch didn’t come to party hop. Her big plans include visiting the Smithsonian on Saturday with her 9-year-old daughter before attending the dinner for the first time.

“The weekend needed an after-party,” Hay said. So she started one seven years ago and now it’s one that Washington natives look forward to attending. “I like this party because it’s smaller. I live here in D.C. so I do this all the time. Seeing this many celebrities is too much, said Victoria Michael, who was at her second event of the night.

This party celebrated women in journalism, this year honoring Rene Marsh of CNN, Leigh Gallagher the author of “The End of the Suburbs” and Rebecca Cooper of “Washington Business Report.”

The house party did feature a few recognizable faces in the crowd, but the rhinestone covered toilet in the guest bathroom was probably the most photographed thing at the party.

  • Cara Kelly
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The celebs who came to Creative Coalition’s benefit dinner and party at STK (the newish D.C. restaurant known as “not your daddy’s steakhouse”) had to work for their meal Friday night. Led by coalition president Tim Daly, a gaggle of actors headed to Capitol Hill earlier in the afternoon to lobby for funding for the arts and support for the National Endowment for the Arts.

“I think a mind opened … Maybe two minds,” said Daly. “And as you know opening minds on Capitol Hill is not an easy feat.”

Drake Bell of “Drake & Josh” felt like a tourist as he traipsed from the Hill to the White House, where the coalition got a private tour and met with staff. Sean Giambrone (“The Goldbergs”), Jonathan Groff (“Frozen”), Wendi McLendon-Covey (“The Goldbergs”), Joe Morton (“Scandal”), Dean Norris (“Breaking Bad”), and Jeffrey Tambor (“Arrested Development”) were also in the lobbying group, dubbed called “coalition ambassadors.” After their day of advocacy, they settled into the dimly lit steakhouse for specialty margaritas lined with Hawaiian black sea salt and other libations sponsored by Maestro Dobel Tequila, Blue Moon Brewing and Fiji water.

Constance Zimmer claimed to have been the actor with the best shot of convincing both Republicans and Democrats of the virtue of their cause. On “House of Cards” she plays a liberal leaning journalist. On “The Newsroom” she played a Republican strategist. “I feel like I walk into Congress and they all think they know me,” she said.

(Reporting by Krissah Thompson)

  • Cara Kelly
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  • Lavanya Ramanathan
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The Dupont Circle-based Voto Latino was honoring minority voices in journalism, and drew what was probably the longest-lingering crowd of mostly established Washingtonians — many in cocktail dresses, very few who even bothered to put on a tie, much less black tie. (Though there were a few bow ties.) Friends, old classmates and perhaps too many publicists hugged and squealed and took pictures with the Washington Monument as their backdrop, lending the whole thing a vibe that was more Nerd Reunion than Nerd Prom.

Surely, Rosario Dawson, Voto Latino’s co-founder, something of a regular at Washington political parties, would be there. Alas, no. Voto Latino spokeswoman Yandary Zavala promised the starlet would be in Washington in time for the main event Saturday. Filling in was Wilmer Valderrama, of the long-gone “That 70s Show,” who actively avoided any mingling with the crowd, but managed to hit all his talking points, mentioning his interest in immigration policy (he’s from Venezuela, his family came here “and found the American Dream”) and in the growing political power of Latinos (a trend, he notes, that was decades in the making).

Did he think it was important for celebrities to be in Washington this weekend? Valderrama was quick to separate himself from the Correspondents’ weekend celebrity hoi polloi. “There’s a lot of people who come here because they want to take a picture with the president, to be completely honest. They want to put on a suit and walk the red carpet and go to a really fancy dinner.” But, he added “there’s another percentage of the Hollywood community that really understands what their role is, that it’s an organic extension of their jobs, when it comes to social awareness.”

  • Nicole Arthur
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Among those in attendance at the W Hotel: NPR’s Nina Totenberg, The Post’s E.J. Dionne, New Yorker editor David Remnick, David Brooks of the New York Times, the New Republic editor Franklin Foer, Fox News’s Howard Kurtz, Margaret Talbot, Arthur Allen, Seymour Hersh, Jeffrey Goldberg, David Corn, “This Town” author Mark Leibovich and former Washington Post executive editor Marcus Brauchli.

Mindy Kaling was there, though.

  • Emily Yahr
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Would it surprise you to know that Robert De Niro doesn’t do small talk? The legendary actor, 70, participated in a Q&A on Friday night after an HBO/Politico-sponsored screening of his documentary about his father, “Remembering the Artist: Robert De Niro, Sr.,” and was blunt when he didn’t know — or didn’t want to answer — certain questions.

De Niro (dubbed by The Hollywood Reporter as one of the only A-list movie stars in attendance at this year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner weekend) spoke fondly of his late father; but some questions posed by moderator Mike Allen of Politico got abrupt responses. Was there anything about his father he appreciated in a new light after seeing the film? “No, not really.” Did he ever watch any of his films with his dad? “No, never.” Which of his movies was his father’s favorite? “I have no idea.”

Noted! But for the most part, De Niro appeared in high spirits during the event at Longview Gallery, which was packed with so many people that the actual screening ran out of chairs. Meanwhile, De Niro gamely posed and hummed to himself during a seemingly endless run of red carpet photos with his wife, Grace Hightower, and the film’s directors, Perri Peltz and Geeta Gandbhir. De Niro also seemed a bit emotional after the screening of the HBO documentary, premiering June 9, which chronicled his father’s legacy as a talented but struggling artist. He talked at length about his father’s life, along with his own religious beliefs.

Post-Q&A, De Niro happily chatted with his friend, former Sen. Chris Dodd, CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America, though De Niro soon disappeared to a VIP section behind a curtain. Other bold-faced names at the event who mingled at the pre-screening reception included filmmaker Morgan Spurlock; Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy; and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, whose daughter, Alexandra, has produced several HBO documentaries. Pelosi posed on the red carpet with her husband, Paul, and granddaughter, Madeline.

  • Cara Kelly
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  • Helena Andrews-Dyer
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At the Atlantic Media dinner held at owner David Bradley’s posh Embassy Row home, the talk of the night was the cast of “House of Cards” — minus the show’s most devious and famous names, stars Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright. Michael Kelly, whose character Doug Stamper has an uncertain future, said his guess was as good as ours on what’s in store for him.

“If you find out, please let me know,” said Kelly who was having a great time schmoozing with the likes of Chris Mathews and Wolf Blizter. “You just meet so many great people who aren’t from your world,” said Kelly, who told us he majored in political science in college. “To us it’s cool.”

Mathews, who was there with his wife Kathleen, the compliment was appreciated. The alleged celebrification of the White House Correspondents’ Dinner didn’t bother him one bit. “There’s nothing wrong with fun,” said Matthews, before adding that you never know what could happen at one of these things. He met his wife at the 1978 Radio and Television Correspondents’ dinner after all. “So these things are important.”

  • Ben Terris
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New media!!! It’s hip! It smells like pot outside, the dance floor has a smoke machine, there are little pathetic cardboard robots that talk when you swipe your badge over them, and there are drinks from the new Shaw bar Eat the Rich. “Dig the music” on the dance floor? Swipe your badge over a hanging white orb with a screen on it and let em know!

There’s a screen that counts the number of “hover actions” (whatever that is) at 799 and rising. A group of guys in green T-shirts that proclaim they are the Selfie Squad roam the floor, presumably assisting individuals with what uses to be a solitary action.

Here are some examples of the Selfie Squad in action at the New Media Party at Carnegie Library.

  • Cara Kelly
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As party guests at the Capitol File magazine reception sipped on their second or third cocktails, British ambassador Sir Peter Westmacott strode to a podium at the top of the stone steps of the residence’s terraced garden and thanked the crowd for coming: “Washington is extremely grateful to all you beautiful people,” he said, meaning the stars who descend on Washington for the annual White House Correspondents Dinner festivities, “to brighten our lives and dilute the nerdery.”

Some of the party’s promised A-listers had not yet arrived, but were due to show up later, the ambassador said — including “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus and famed director Steve McQueen.

He singled out the guest of honor, Robin Wright of “House of Cards”: “We’re thrilled to have her here with so many of her fellow stars,” and the crowd erupted in cheers and applause.

The ambassador noted that the show was an offshoot of the original British series – which some people, he said, told him they prefer. He glanced at Wright, who smiled from the steps below. “I tell them – you may well think that,” he said, “but I couldn’t possibly comment.”

When it was her turn at the podium, Capitol File magazine’s editor-in-chief, Elizabeth Thorp, said she wasn’t quite prepared to address the gathering of glamorous partygoers gathered on the terrace.

“It’s a little daunting to make welcome remarks in front of this,” she said, pausing to gesture dramatically to the crowd on the marble steps: “a mass of Washington power and prestige.”

But as her eyes swept the crowd, she said, one person in particular made a powerful impression.

“Locking eyes with Claire Underwood,” Thorp said with a theatrical shiver. “The steely gaze of Hell.”

On the steps below, Robin Wright – looking every bit as poised and inscrutable as the character she’s famous for – smiled slightly.

“I’m scared of you,” Thorp joked.

(Reporting by Caitlin Gibson)

  • Emily Heil
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At the cocktail party at the St. Regis hotel thrown by People and Time magazine, Hollywood celebrities and Washington types began their annual ritual of pre- White House Correspondents’ Dinner mingling.

Some celebs professed themselves to be uncharacteristically awed by the nation’s capitol. Scott Foley, the actor who plays the head of a shady B613 organization on ABC’s “Scandal,” accompanied by his wife, Marika, said this was his first visit. Not a bad introduction — he’s getting a tour of the White House tomorrow. “Is it weird to say I’m excited to be in the same room as the president?” he asked. “I mean, I know it’s a big room, but still…”

And actor Timothy Simons, who plays the love-to-hate-him aide-turned blogger Jonah on HBO’s “Veep,” says the lampooning treatment the show gives Washington hasn’t totally turned him off. “I still have a little bit of respect for the institution, if you can believe that,” he says.

As Foley gamely fielded questions from fans and photo-seekers, ladies of a certain age were queuing up around Patrick Duffy, best known as Bobby Ewing on the long-running soap “Dallas.”

Elsewhere, newly minted MSNBC host Ronan Farrow huddled with Walter Issacson, “Meet the Press” host David Gregory worked the room and White House social secretary Jeremey Bernard greeted friends.

CNN’s Dana Bash and her boyfriend, the actor Spencer Garrett, were all smiles, as was “Today” host Savannah Guthrie and her husband Michael Feldman. Several other “Scandal” cast members, including Bellamy Young and Darby Stanchfeild, arrived late.

Comparing schedules — who’s going to which parties and lunches — was Topic A. WHCA president Steve Thomma — who will sit on the dais tomorrow night — said he had but one item on his agenda for the evening: “Vodka!” he said. “Because I can’t have any tomorrow night.”

  • Ben Terris
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Entertainment Tonight and The Hill newspaper threw a joint party at the Canadian Embassy tonight. If it seems like an odd pairing at first, it begins to make a bit of sense. They each, after all, have a similar mission: take a place that a general audience cares a bit about, but that a certain audience can’t get enough of, and give them every possible story.

Each organization would have plenty of fodder from this party. Tom Cruise’s son, Connor, spun dance music, lobbyists took selfies on the roof, “ET’s” Nancy O’Dell hosted the red carpet affairs and Spike Mendelsohn of Good Stuff eatery provided the cocktails. There was shrimp for everyone.

Guests included a bunch of people from “ET,” Katharine McPhee from “Smash” and Broadway fame, Toure the pop culture journalist, Brett Baier from Fox News, the RNC’s Reince Priebus, and Sens. Joe Manchin and Roy Blunt.

The spokesman for the beer lobby, Christopher Thorne of the Beer Institute, gave his business card to “The Most Interesting Man in the World.”

Oh – and there was a Mountie.

Spike Mendelsohn

Greta Van Susteren

Touré

  • Cara Kelly
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The legendary bag of donated products is a mere 17.2 lbs this year — down a full 3 lbs from 2013. The best items upon first glace? A pair of Skullcandy headphones, SoulCycle certificate and a great pair of socks.

Check out all 41 items

  • Emily Yahr
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  • JulieAnn McKellogg
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Hey isn’t that…”Scandal” star Bellamy Young being trailed on the National Mall by a slew of photographers and a school group from her home state of North Carolina? We got a chance to pull Young off her monuments tour with The Trust for the National Mall team to get her response to some “advice” given to her by her on-screen husband, Tony Goldwyn.

In an interview with The Reliable Source on Thursday, Goldwyn, who plays President Fitzgerald Grant on the hit ABC series, said Young’s character, Mellie Grant, needs to “chill out.” Young, in character, responded, “If he would just love me, I would have no problems.”

Young and Goldwyn are in town for this weekend’s annual White House Correspondents’ Association dinner.

 

  • Emily Yahr
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One minute, a guy dressed as Teen Wolf runs through the audience; a few seconds later, it’s “Please welcome Vice President Joe Biden!” That’s just sort of the way it goes at the Creativity Conference, an annual Hollywood and tech-themed event that takes place during White House Correspondents’ Dinner weekend. This year’s gathering, held Friday at the Newseum, featured three main themes: Promoting movies and TV shows from various company sponsors; the importance of copyright laws; and one day, we will all live among robots. (That last bit came courtesy of a panel titled “Could ‘HER’ Become Reality?” in which 3D technology experts confirmed that in the near future, we will all be born with robot companions that anticipate our every need. It was terrifying.)

Beyond sci-fi talk, there was star power in the form of the vice president (who stopped by before a lunch meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel), delivering a speech on protecting intellectual property. Talking about the days when a “camcorder was about the size of a golf bag” but people still sneaked recorders into movie theaters, he said, issues concerning illegal bootleg content have only gotten worse over time. Still, he urged creative types in the crowd to keep fighting. “The wealth of a nation is found in the creative mind of its people,” Biden said, adding in a message to movie and TV makers, “You are the face of American culture to the rest of the world.” Then: Lots of product placement. With Disney-owned ABC News as a sponsor (along with the Motion Picture Association of America, Microsoft and many others), the crowd was treated to sneak peeks of lots of Disney movies. Tony Goldwyn, star of ABC’s “Scandal,” spoke on a panel about how social media builds an audience. Goldwyn, who admitted he was initially “terrified” of Twitter, said the stars tweeting along with during the D.C.-set primetime soap is one of the main reasons it became a hit. Fellow panelist, filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, also said whenever he’s in pitch meetings with networks, an essential ingredient for any project is the the “tweetability” of it all.

Oh, and Teen Wolf? That was a promo for Syfy’s makeup artist competition reality show “Face Off.” (Artist Tyler Green transformed his brother into the werewolf over the span of the conference.) Meanwhile, a floor above, a costumed minion from Universal’s “Despicable Me” movies danced around; elsewhere, a long line of eager attendees waited to get a photo with the Iron Throne, the iconic set piece from “Game of Thrones,” which was also on display, thanks to sponsor HBO.

  • Paul Farhi
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Lesley Clark, the White House reporter for McClatchy newspapers, got a nice surprise on Friday: She was the first reporter called on by President Obama during his Rose Garden press conference with German chancellor Angela Merkel. It typically isn’t this easy — or nearly this glamorous — for the White House correspondent.  Read more about the life of a White House Correspondent here.

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 30: Lesley Clark, a White House reporter for McClatchy Newspapers, in the briefing room on April, 30, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

Lesley Clark, a White House reporter for McClatchy Newspapers, in the briefing room on April, 30, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

  • Cara Kelly
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Report from Ben Terris:

The blending of real and fake Washington reached some kind of apotheosis this morning at the Woolly Mammoth Theater, where Mike Allen interviewed two semi-famous actors from the television show “Scandal” and two of their less recognizable counterparts.

On “Scandal,” Dan Bucatinsky played a former White House journalist who sleeps with the President’s chief of staff and then becomes the Press Secretary. Jeff Perry, plays that Chief of Staff. The two took to the stage with Dee Dee Myers and Andy Card, who held the same roles for Bill Clinton and George W. Bush respectively (minus the relationship of course…). “Serious question,” Mike Allen said at one point. “Is Fitz a good president?” “He’s got a swimmer’s build, so who cares,” Bucatinsky said of the fake president on “Scandal.” The actors also got to hear from Myers and Card what the job was actually like. Card said one of the hardest parts of the job was just keeping the president fed and on schedule.”It’s so spousal, it’s amazing,” Bucatinsky said in response.

Myers, for her part, is used to this overlap of Hollywood and D.C. She has been called the inspiration for the character C.J. on the West Wing, and helped consult on the show. Recently, she took a job with Warner Brothers.

“[I’ve lived] between real Washington and fake Washington before,” she said. “I’m excited about it.”

During Allen’s first panel he interviewed YouTube sensation Robby Novak, the 10-year old better known as Kid President. Novak talked about the time he visited the White House, and because this is the kind of thing kids do, he licked the wall.​

“I have a question that I’ve never asked before and will never ask again,” Allen said. “What does the White House taste like.”

“It tastes like silk,” Novak shouted.

Kid President also told Allen he kissed Beyonce once. “What was she like,” Allen asked.

  • Cara Kelly
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The vibe at the Rock the Vote party at the Hierarchy Gallery was more up-and-comers than who’s who. Read more here.



  • Emily Heil
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The celebration of women in journalism that P.R. maven Gloria Dittus threw on Thursday night to kick off the weekend of festivities surrounding the White House Correspondents Association Dinner felt like a moment to take a breath.

Read more about the party here.

  • JulieAnn McKellogg
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  • JulieAnn McKellogg
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DJ Beauty & the Beatz appeared to be the youngest attendee at the White House correspondents’ dinner pre-party Thursday night hosted by Devex and Foreign Affairs magazine. And she was definitely the second most popular among party goers, after “Scandal’s” Tony Goldwyn.

The 12-year-old local DJ kept the party of foreign affairs wonks living up to its name, “Global Beat,” with a set that included artists like Lorde, Jay-Z and Iggy Azalea.

This was not even close to her first professional event. Just last week, DJ Beauty & the Beatz, whose real name is Sierra Roundtree, was at the White House DJing the Easter Egg Roll.

She’s been spinning since she was 7-years-old and started professionally a year later. She would bring along crates to her early gigs just so she could reach the table.

Roundtree has opened for rapper Sage the Gemini, works with VH1’s non-profit “Save the Music,” and even teaches her own masterclass for young, aspiring deejays.

Given her age, there are some rules set by her parents. “Regulations are paying attention to the lyrics of the music. Making sure it’s clean because of her age,” said her mom and manager, Takicha Roundtree.

This young entertainer has some big plans to become a worldwide deejay and to advocate for women in music through a business she wants to start and has already named, “Girl DJs Rock.”

  • Cara Kelly
  • ·

On Thursday night the president–well at least according to ABC–christened the White House Correspondents’ Association weekend at Devex and Foreign Affairs magazine’s “Global Beat” party at the U.N Foundation, co-sponsored by Washington Life.

Read more about the party here.

 


  • Cara Kelly
  • ·

Post reporter Roxanne Roberts explains how a few celebrities changed the course of an otherwise quiet event.

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