Perhaps Hillary Clinton is counting on the number of scandals, untruths and misdeeds to numb the public and media at some point. It’s not a bad strategy given the stuff that seems to wash up on the shore from the Clintons each day.

Recall what we already know: She kept a private server at her home in violation of State Department policy. She wiped the server clean so no third party could examine more than 30,000 e-mails. She signed an agreement with the administration promising to disclose potential conflicts regarding her husband’s speeches; she violated it repeatedly. Her foundation continued to receive foreign donations and in some cases pay for Bill Clinton’s speeches while Hillary Clinton was in office. The foundation has been described by a charity watchdog as a sort of slush fund whereby those wanting to gain access and favors to a president-in-waiting could contribute (with a tax write-off!). Numerous firms (including a Russian purchaser of critical uranium) and countries from whom the Clintons received speaking fees and/or contributions to the foundation wound up with business before the administration. The foundation in turn gave her visibility, paid for exorbitant travel and employed her cronies. That catches us up to this week.

So far — and it is only Tuesday — we have learned that despite her lawyer’s representations to the contrary, Hillary Clinton used yet another private e-mail address. Those e-mails (the ones not destroyed) that were turned over to the State Department are not going to be made public until January 2016. So much for coming clean any time soon. And now to top it off we learn famous Clinton flunky Sid Blumenthal, who was barred from working at the State Department, was busy writing policy memos for the secretary. The New York Times reports:

AD
AD
When the Clintons last occupied the White House, Sidney Blumenthal cast himself in varied roles: speechwriter, in-house intellectual and press corps whisperer. Republicans added another, accusing Mr. Blumenthal of spreading gossip to discredit Republican investigators, and forced him to testify during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial. . . . According to emails obtained by The New York Times, Mrs. Clinton, who was secretary of state at the time, took Mr. Blumenthal’s advice seriously, forwarding his memos to senior diplomatic officials in Libya and Washington and at times asking them to respond. Mrs. Clinton continued to pass around his memos even after other senior diplomats concluded that Mr. Blumenthal’s assessments were often unreliable.
But an examination by The Times suggests that Mr. Blumenthal’s involvement was more wide-ranging and more complicated than previously known, embodying the blurry lines between business, politics and philanthropy that have enriched and vexed the Clintons and their inner circle for years. . . . It is not clear whether Mrs. Clinton or the State Department knew of Mr. Blumenthal’s interest in pursuing business in Libya; a State Department spokesman declined to say. Many aspects of Mr. Blumenthal’s involvement in the planned Libyan venture remain unclear. He declined repeated requests to discuss it.
But interviews with his associates and a review of previously unreported correspondence suggest that — once again — it may be difficult to determine where one of Mr. Blumenthal’s jobs ended and another began.

Clinton’s judgment here is horrific — from using a private e-mail account to allowing someone so obviously conflicted to spread his views within her department to taking advice on foreign policy at all from Blumenthal. (“The emails suggest that Mr. Blumenthal’s direct line to Mrs. Clinton circumvented the elaborate procedures established by the federal government to ensure that high-level officials are provided with vetted assessments of available intelligence.”)

The Fix observed that when asked about Blumenthal, Clinton’s answer — that she was going to keep old friends around — was certainly not reassuring. “So, jettisoning ‘old friends’ who keep getting the Clintons into hairy territory perception-wise would seem to make all the sense in the world. And yet, her response when questioned about Blumenthal’s role as a sort of ad hoc adviser on Libya, is, basically, Hey I’ve known this guy for a long time so I’m not going to say anything bad about him.” No, the Clintons learn nothing; they only double down.

It is easy to see that Clinton’s behavior was not merely sleazy or improper; it also caused her to rely on and urge others to rely on unvetted information from a conflicted source. In short, she let her crony put suspect material into the system. Once again, her personal relationships trumped her obligation to the public.

AD
AD

At this point I don’t think Clinton could be confirmed for any high government post, and yet she wants a promotion to president. She is likely banking on the number and details of the scandals to cause voters’ eyes to glaze over. But what is the excuse for Democratic officeholders and party insiders to refrain from condemning the growing list of misdeeds? It’s remarkable — and somewhat horrifying — that serious Democrats aren’t trying to get someone else who is a viable nominee.

AD
AD