Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Rick Santorum has decided his party and country need him, so he’s throwing his hat into the ring for 2016. So for the Republicans who want to win the White House, don’t worry— he won’t come anywhere close to his success in 2012. Here’s why:

1. Satan

2. Birth control

3. 41 percent – That is all he could muster in his 2006 re-election loss. In the race are Republicans who won re-election in New Jersey, Florida, Ohio and Wisconsin. Isn’t one of them far more likely to bring in votes outside of the deep red states?

4. At least 7 other candidates are more electable and better qualified. (Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former Florida governor Jeb Bush, former Texas governor Rick Perry, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, Bobby Jindal of Louisiana). He couldn’t upend a much worse candidate in the past, Mitt Romney, so it is nearly impossible to imagine he would beat all of these contenders, plus some talented newcomers like Carly Fiorina.

5. 1991 – The year he entered the House. He’s actually been around in D.C. longer than Hillary Clinton and before any Bush was elected president Bush 41 left office.

6. He at one time opposed national right to work legislation and wanted to reaffirm Davis-Bacon (requiring union wages on government contracts). Umm, Gov. Walker?

7.  He was among the most undisciplined candidates in 2012. In a Twitter political universe the press and opponents will have a field day.

So why is he running? Pretty much the same reason so many other candidates are. They figure in a field this crowded, anyone can get lucky, sneak into the primary, and build momentum. Moreover, Santorum won Iowa last time around.  Right about now,  Republicans should be thanking Fox for setting a ten candidate limit on debates— lest George Pataki (yup, he’s already decided) Eric Cantor wants to stage a comeback.

Former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum is running for president in 2016. Here is the Republican's take on the Islamic State, immigration, education and more, in his own words. (Alice Li/The Washington Post)