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Tampons threatened during Texas abortion debate

I can understand if they took away knives and guns. But tampons?

That’s what  happened to women who wanted to watch the ongoing debate over proposed abortion restrictions in the Texas senate Friday when state troopers tried to confiscate their tampons and other feminine hygiene products.

Why? Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, the senate president, reportedly didn’t want the women to have any items that could be thrown from the gallery at the lawmakers during their discussion. To be fair, that’s about anything a woman could carry in her purse, and one Twitter photo showed a box of energy bars in the box of confiscated items.

But there’s an ugly side to what sounds like a ridiculous story: According to KETK news,Texas Department of Public Safety officers inspecting bags found one jar suspected to contain urine, 18 jars suspected of holding feces and three jars suspected to contain paint.

An Associated Press story reported that Texas state Sen. Kirk Watson of Austin, the leader of the Texas Senate Democrats, said he stopped the tampon confiscation and called the move “boneheaded” and “crazy.”

But a news release on the DPS web site states the inspections will continue.

Just remember, as David McLemore, a Texas freelance writer and author of “A Soldier’s Joy,” wrote on his Facebook page: “When tampons are outlawed, only outlaws will have tampons.”

Diana Reese is a journalist in Overland Park, Kan. Follow her on Twitter at @dianareese.

 

 

Diana Reese is a journalist in Overland Park, Kan. Follow her on Twitter at @dianareese.

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