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World Cup live blog: July 8

July 8, 2014

Brazil takes on Germany in the first semifinal, which will kick off at 4 p.m. Eastern time.

Preview: Brazil, unlikely underdog | How Brazil can win | Knockout-round bracket | Streaming coverage | Full coverage

  • Marissa Payne
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Let’s get our heads out of Brazil vs. Germany and look ahead to Argentina vs. the Netherlands, shall we?

See you right here tomorrow for what will hopefully be a less lopsided game.

  • Marissa Payne
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The Washington Post’s correspondent Dom Phillips was in Rio to capture all the reactions of Brazil’s population as they watched the home team succumb to one of the most horrifying losses in soccer history. Here’s what he wrote:

When Germany began its scoring barrage, scuffles broke out on the beach. From across the street, the crack of firecrackers and a hiss of a tear gas grenade could be heard. On the beach, beverage vendor Luiz Paulo, 60, began packing up his stall. “There was a fight. The police went in hitting,” he said. “Fighting and tumult.”

But huge numbers of police and municipal and national guardsmen lining Copacabana’s Atlantica Avenue — not to mention the quick and devastating nature of the defeat — dissipated the tension. Police infiltrated the crowd on the beach and anger turned to disappointment. With the score at 5-0 Germany at halftime, fans stood around in a state of shock.

Read the rest of the sad story by clicking here.

  • Marissa Payne
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Via Twitter, of course.

Like all Brazilians, I am very, very sad about the defeat.

I feel greatly for everyone, the fans and the players.

But let us no act weakened.

Brazil, “rises up, shakes the dust off and makes a comeback.”

  • Marissa Payne
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With Neymar looking at you.

(Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

(Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

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(Silvia Izquierdo/AP)

(Silvia Izquierdo/AP)

Remember all the protests in the run-up to the tournament? If not, here’s a primer: Thousands of Brazilians took the the streets to protest the amount of money being thrown at the World Cup, opposed to more pressing matters, like the economy. Well, Brazil’s soccer loss might be an economic boon, reports The Washington Post’s Max Ehrenfreund. He spoke to Jorge Mariscal, who co-authored a report citing evidence that says just that and wrote:

Mariscal argued that a win for Brazil would vindicate the decision of the government, led by President Dilma Rousseff, to host the Cup. If the team loses, Mariscal argued, Rousseff’s reelection campaign later this year could become even more difficult. “There’s tremendous pressure on the players to deliver and on the government to deliver,” Mariscal said.

Mariscal and his colleagues wrote that her defeat would lead to a rally in Brazilian stocks, once everyone stops sulking.

Read more about what some might call an inadvertent bright side to the loss by clicking here.

  • Marissa Payne
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(Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

(Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

Well, Brazil lost at home in that one, too. But at least they made it to the finals. The Washington Post’s Steven Goff writes from Belo Horizonte, Brazil:

It’s been said Brazil has never fully recovered from its greatest sporting tragedy, the 1950 home loss to Uruguay in the World Cup final. Despite proceeding to win a record five global crowns and injecting beauty into the beautiful game, for blessing the sport with Garrincha and Pele, Zizinho and Zico, Romario and Ronaldo, Brazil remains haunted by the ghosts of “Maracanazo” — a term symbolizing heartbreak that day at Rio’s Maracana stadium.

After what unfolded Tuesday, a 7-1 defeat to Germany in the semifinals, Brazil will have to coin a new idiom to pass through the generations, an expression to capture what it looked and felt like at Estadio Mineirao, what it meant to concede four goals in six minutes of the first half, to suffer one of the most humbling setbacks in World Cup annals and the worst loss in the great history of Brazilian soccer.

While 1950 was pure heartbreak — a late goal in a game that Brazil only needed to tie to claim the title under round-robin format — this was a calamity.

Read the rest by clicking here.

  • Marissa Payne
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  • Marissa Payne
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Brazil's coach Luiz Felipe Scolari consoles Oscar after losing to Germany. (Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

Brazil’s coach Luiz Felipe Scolari consoles Oscar after losing to Germany. (Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

When asked about who’s to blame for the devastating semifinal loss to Germany, Brazilian coach Luiz Felipe Scolari said, “The results and the person responsible is me,” at a post-game press conference.

There is a good chance he will resign due to the performance.

  • Marissa Payne
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(Marcus Brandt/EPA)

(Marcus Brandt/EPA)


Seven goals. There were SEVEN GOALS. That is a lot. Here’s who scored ‘em and when they happened:

Thomas Muller, minute 11

Miroslav Klose, minute 23

Toni Kroos, minute 24

Toni Kroos, minute 26

Sami Khedira, minute 29

Andre Schurrle, minute 69

Andre Schurrle, minute 79

  • Marissa Payne
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Brazil Germany
1 Goals 7
1 Assists 6
17 Shots 14
12 Shots on Goal 12
5 Saves 11
0 Penalties Scored 0
0 Penalty Kicks 0
13 Crosses 11
7 Corner Kicks 5
3 Offside 0
10 Fouls Committed 13
1 Cautions/Yellow Cards 0
0 Red Cards 0
47% Ball Possession 53%
  • Marissa Payne
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Yes, the Brazuca, which has its own Twitter account, has no words. OK, well, it has one word, and the ball speaks for pretty much all of us.

  • Marissa Payne
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Luiz and Silva. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

Luiz and Silva. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

With Silva suspended due to yellow card violation, Luiz stepped in as the team’s temporary captain. It seemed like a good idea considering he scored the winning goal in the quarterfinal. But today, the player with the wild hair didn’t shine.

In a post game interview, he fought through sobs to apologize to Brazilians. He said the team just wanted to make the country happy, but they couldn’t do it.

(Eddie Keogh/Reuters)

(Eddie Keogh/Reuters)

  • Marissa Payne
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 Philipp Lahm of Germany consoles Oscar of Brazil after Germany's 7-1 win. (Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

Philipp Lahm of Germany consoles Oscar of Brazil after Germany’s 7-1 win. (Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

  • Marissa Payne
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Perhaps to stave off potential riots or fights, ESPN is reporting German fans in the stands have been told to remain there until the rest of the stadium clears. At that point, they’ll be escorted out.

  • Marissa Payne
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Andre Schurrle celebrates. (Ballesteros/EPA)

Andre Schurrle celebrates. (Ballesteros/EPA)

The referee blew the whistle, which was probably a relief to everyone. The final score was Germany up 7-1 over Brazil. This is probably the worst Brazilian defeat in history.

For Germany, however, this result is delightful. They’re onto their eighth World Cup final match.

  • Marissa Payne
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Hey, it’s something, right? Maybe the kids in the stands will stop crying for a minute or two?

Way to go Oscar! Now just 6 more to go…

  • Marissa Payne
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(John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

(John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Marissa Payne
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(Marcus Brandt/EPA)

(Marcus Brandt/EPA)


It’s Germany’s last substitution and they might as well use it. It’s pretty clear the allotted 30 minutes of extra time won’t be necessary tonight. In his place, Julian Draxler came in. This is his first appearance in the World Cup. That’s good. The 20-year-old will get some practice.

  • Marissa Payne
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Schurrle gets his second, which is Germany’s seventh. Brazil’s David Luiz had the option to run the ball down, but it looks like he decided not to. I guess he’s saving his energy for the consolation match on Saturday that determines third and fourth place?

So sad…

  • Marissa Payne
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