The Washington Post

Are you living together without tying the knot?

More than ever, couples are choosing to live together without tying the knot. But of course that doesn’t guarantee happily-ever-after cohabitation. A recent survey of divorce lawyers found an increase in litigation between unmarried couples.

They also reported a rise in cohabitation agreements -- legal documents that spell how assets would be divided in the event of a breakup.

For a story about these shifting trends, we’re looking to talk to people who’ve gone through breakups after moving in with a significant other. Perhaps you bought property together, intermingled your finances or even had a child -- and then had to figure out how to unravel everything when the relationship ended.

We’re also interested in talking to couples who chose to sign cohabitation agreements about the thought process that went into crafting that document.

To share your story, please contact reporter Ellen McCarthy:, 202-334-7272.

Ellen McCarthy is a feature writer for Style. She is the author of "The Real Thing: Lessons on Love and Life from a Wedding Reporter's Notebook."


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