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Live updates: Oscars 2016

February 29, 2016

Host Chris Rock speaks at the 2016 Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Complete coverage of the 88th Academy Awards from the best red carpet moments to the highlights of the show.

  • Emily Yahr
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The biggest award of Oscars evening went to “Spotlight,” which pulled out a win for best picture in a very split year. The Tom McCarthy-directed film won one trophy early in the night for best original screenplay, though as the evening progressed, momentum seemed to be with “The Revenant,” which won best cinematography, director and lead actor. But the journalism drama prevailed and became the sixth best picture winner in history to only win two awards on Oscar night, and the first since 1952.

Earlier in the night, “Bridge of Spies” star Mark Rylance surprised everyone when he triumphed for supporting actor over Sylvester Stallone (“Creed”), whom many considered a nostalgic favorite. Elsewhere the acting prizes were fairly predictable, including Alicia Vikander (“The Danish Girl”) as supporting actress; Brie Larson (“Room”) as lead actress; Alejandro Iñárritu as director (“The Revenant”); and Leonardo DiCaprio (“The Revenant”) finally clinching lead actor.

Meanwhile, dystopian blockbuster “Mad Max: Fury Road” swept the technical prizes, ending up the biggest winner of the night with six awards.

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  • Washington Post Staff
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  • Bethonie Butler
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The most prestigious award of the night goes to “Spotlight,” about the Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation into decades of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church. The film already won an Oscar tonight for best original screenplay.

“This film gave a voice to survivors, and this Oscar amplifies that voice which we hope will become a choir that will resonate all the way to the Vatican,” the producers said while accepting the trophy. “Pope Francis, it’s time to protect the children and restore the faith.”

  • Emily Yahr
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Finally, Leo gets his elusive Oscar and receives a long, standing ovation. He gives a shout out to Tom Hardy, who grins from the crowd; director Alejandro Iñárritu; Michael Caton-Jones, the first director to cast him in a film; as well as the predictable ones, i.e. his team and his parents.
He ends on an environmental note, as he tends to do: “Let us not take this planet for granted,” Leo said, noting that the film crew had to journey to the southernmost tip of the planet to find a place to film with enough snow because last year was the hottest on record. “Climate change is real, it is happening right now… it is the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating.” 

  • Washington Post Staff
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And the award for best picture goes to… “Spotlight.”

This is a non-scientific user poll. Results are not statistically valid and cannot be assumed to reflect the views of Washington Post users as a group or the general population.

  • Dan Zak
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DiCaprio’s first nomination came in 1994, for supporting actor in “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?” He faced stiff competition, namely Ralph Fiennes in “Schindler’s List” and Tommy Lee Jones in “The Fugitive.” DiCaprio was still relatively new to major motion pictures, and that was evident in presenter Marisa Tomei’s continental pronunciation: “DeeCahprio.” Anyway, Jones won.

  • Washington Post Staff
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And the award for best actor goes to… Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant.”

This is a non-scientific user poll. Results are not statistically valid and cannot be assumed to reflect the views of Washington Post users as a group or the general population.

  • Stephanie Merry
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This is the first Oscar for the 26-year-old former child actor who has burst onto the scene in recent years with buzzy roles in both indie movies, such as “Short Term 12,” and blockbusters, like “21 Jump Street” and “Trainwreck.” “I want to start big,” Larson said after accepting her award. “The thing I love about movie making is how many people it takes to make it.” So she thanked the Toronto Film Festival, A24, director Lenny Abrahamson, co-star Jacob Tremblay, her boyfriend, Alex Greenwald, and her parents, among others.

  • Washington Post Staff
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  • Washington Post Staff
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And the winner for best actress is… Brie Larson, “Room”

This is a non-scientific user poll. Results are not statistically valid and cannot be assumed to reflect the views of Washington Post users as a group or the general population.

  • Bethonie Butler
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This is a back-to-back win for Iñárritu, who won multiple awards including best director for “Birdman” last year. He’s only the third director to win successive awards in this category (sharing the honor with John Ford and Joseph L. Mankiewicz). “Leo, you are ‘The Revenant,’ Iñárritu told the star of his film (and the presumed winner of the best lead actor category). The director also thanked the Native American cast members of his film and said that he hoped the film presented “a great opportunity to our generation to really liberate ourselves from all prejudice” before dedicating the award to his father.

  • Washington Post
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And the award for best director goes to… Alejandro Iñárritu, “The Revenant.”

This is a non-scientific user poll. Results are not statistically valid and cannot be assumed to reflect the views of Washington Post users as a group or the general population.

  • Emily Yahr
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“I actually can’t breathe right now!” Sam Smith says accepting the award for best song. He quickly turns serious, mentioning an Ian McKellen quote about how no openly gay man has ever won an Oscar. (Twitter started fact-checking this immediately.) “If this is the case, and even if it isn’t, I dedicate this to the LGBT community around the world,” Smith said. “I stand here tonight as a proud gay man.”

  • Stephanie Merry
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Surprisingly, this is the first Oscar win — other than an honorary award in 2007 — for the legendary Italian composer known for scoring “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “The Untouchables,” “Bugsy” and “Days of Heaven.” Through a translator, Morricone thanked the academy, his wife and Quentin Tarantino, and paid homage to fellow nominee John Williams, who was nominated for “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.”

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  • Washington Post Staff
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And the winner for best original song is… “Writing’s on the Wall” from “Spectre,” music and lyric by Jimmy Napes and Sam Smith.

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And the winner for best original score is… Ennio Morricone for “The Hateful Eight.” 

  • Emily Yahr
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Joe Biden in the house — he gets a big standing ovation from the Hollywood crowd. “I’m the least qualified man here tonight,” he assures everyone as the applause winds down.

He’s there to introduce Lady Gaga’s performance of “Til It Happens To You” (nominated for best original song) from the film “The Hunting Ground,” about sexual assault on college campuses.

“Too many women and men on and off college campuses are still victims of sexual abuse,” Biden says. He asks everyone to take a pledge that says “I will intervene in situations when consent has not or cannot be given.”

“Let’s change the culture,” Biden continued. “We must and we can change the culture so that no abused woman or man, like the survivors you will see tonight, ever feel they have to ask themselves ‘What did I do?’ They did nothing wrong.”

joe

  • Bethonie Butler
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“Son of Saul’s” win marks the second Oscar and ninth nomination for Hungary. “Even in the darkest hours of mankind, there might be a voice within us that allows us to remain human,” director László Nemes said while accepting the award. “That’s the hope of this film.”

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