The Washington Post

Adidas sneakers, JS Roundhouse Mids, spark outrage from rapper Talib Kweli and others

Slave shackles from the 1850’s. (Jay Paul/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

“We apologize if people are offended by the design and we are withdrawing our plans to make them available in the marketplace,” says a statement from the company.

Original: Can slavery be a source of runway inspiration? Adidas designer Jeremy Scott may say yes.

His new fall 2012 kicks, the JS Roundhouse Mids, have caused an outrage on Twitter and Facebook since photos of the shoes were recently released. The bright purple and gray footwear come with an accessory not usually seen on shoes made after 1865: orange shackles.

More than 2000 people, says the Daily Mail, have taken to the Web to express their disdain, citing the shoes’ similarity to shackles worn by slaves and prisoners. Rapper Talib Kweli has been especially vocal, tweeting his anger at Adidas’ Twitter account:

The shoes won’t be sold until August, which gives Adidas and Scott plenty of time to respond to their critics. So far, both have not publicly responded on Twitter to Kweli’s statements.

More from RootDC

‘Growing Up Afro’: Children take center stage

Rodney King dies: Was he a civil rights hero?

Delece is an education reporter for U.S. News.


Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read


Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Your Three. Videos curated for you.
Play Videos
Don’t be ‘that’ sports parent | On Parenting
Miss Manners: The technology's changed, but the rules are the same
A flood of refugees from Syria but only a trickle to America
Play Videos
John Lewis, 'Marv the Barb' and the politics of barber shops
Kids share best advice from mom
Using Fitbit to help kids lose weight
Play Videos
This man's job is binge-watching for Netflix
Transgender swimmer now on Harvard men's team
Portland's most important meal of the day
Play Videos
5 ways to raise girls to be leaders
How much can one woman eat?
The signature drink of New Orleans