The Washington Post

Lunchline: Vets making housecalls

Web site overhauls can be a bit of a mess, depending on how you handle them. Anytime a major change comes to something people are used to, it can cause problems. And over here at Express, the time had come to alter our Web site and that day is here. Check out the new and improved Express Night Out site here. Enjoy!

If that pay raise you got last year didn't seem particularly life changing, there's a reason for that . In the Washington region, inflation rates soared compared to the standard cost-of-living wage raises that many across the workforce received. In short, you might have lost some spending power while actually making more money. Capital Business' V. Dion Haynes explains how this will affect the local economy long term and why some think "this is shaping up to be a lousy holiday season in Washington."

The attachment between a pet and its owner is something that no outsider can truly understand. Many people consider their pets legitimate members of the family, and understandably so. There's a new trend that caters to these pet owners. Instead of going the modern-day Old Yeller route, people are having home euthanasia rituals. The Post's Steve Hendrix reports on the latest craze that has veterinarians making more housecalls.

Have you ever looked at someone's (or maybe your own) job and thought, "wow, a robot could probably do this"? Well, don't look now, but it's likely that such a thing might come true sooner rather than later. Forget about outsourcing jobs to Asia, as data automation and artificial intelligence become more developed, machines could supplant humans altogether in certain sectors. Slate's Farhad Manjoo reports on this terrifying prospect.

As a person in the news industry, it always fascinates me to learn how people get their information. Interestingly, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center and the Knight Foundation, the most popular way people get their information, besides local television news, is the most old-school of all: word of mouth. That's right, those mindless chats you have at the watercooler and in the grocery store are apparently quite a learning experience for some people. The Post's Paul Farhi reports.

Redskins quarterback Rex Grossman, left, and Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo. (John McDonnell/Post and Getty)

Extra Bites

• Nirvana's "Nevermind" album, one of the first I can remember that is truly liked by every single person I know, celebrated its 20th anniversary over the weekend. The Post's Chris Richards chronicles the history of "the album that changed everything." This is my second favorite Nirvana song.

• In another cool update/upgrade news item: the Post's Going Out Guide finally has its own iPhone app. It's like having Fritz Hahn right in your back pocket! For free!

• How does one define awkward? Rick Perry lighting a Hanukkah Menorah.

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Clinton Yates is a D.C. native and an online columnist. When he's not covering the city, pop culture or listening to music, he watches sports. A lot of them.


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