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The Washington Post

The International Monetary Fund has once again downgraded its assessment of the world economy through 2015. This is why.

Sometimes, the emotions people have about the economy are just as important as the actual data.

They might just drop out of the labor force entirely, according to a new paper by JP Morgan.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Dec 2, 2013
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Uncertainty is fading in the economy, and confidence is up. Time to find out if that's been holding back jobs and growth all along.

Ironically, hitting the debt ceiling will almost certainly cause the deficit to balloon. Let us count the ways.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Jan 14, 2013
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The question of “What will happen if the United States goes off the fiscal cliff,” allowing a self-induced austerity crisis, has a pretty simple answer.

  • Neil Irwin
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  • Nov 13, 2012
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If nothing changes, we're set to replicate all the costs of European austerity, and none of the meager benefits.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Nov 9, 2012
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Usually the release of Congressional Budget Office economic and budget projections is as dull as that phrase makes it sound. But not these economic and budget projections, released today by the CBO.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Aug 22, 2012
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The central point of the Georgetown report, that the recession was much milder for people with bachelor's and advanced degrees, is correct, but it's correct because the economy always treats people with higher educational attainment better.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Aug 17, 2012
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It's common knowledge by now that the recession has hit college graduates and non-graduates differently, but the size of the gap is dramatic.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Aug 16, 2012
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The University of Chicago's Loukas Karabarbounis and Brent Neiman have an interesting new working paper documenting how corporations have used their money from 1975 to 2007. The short version: corporations started saving more of their income, and paying less of it out in wages.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Jul 27, 2012
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