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Moving just one Metro stop away can mean big savings on rent, analysis finds

When analyzing by Metro stop, RentHop found rent increased at 65 stops, compared with 50 in 2018. Rents dropped at apartments near 19 stops (compared with 35 stops in 2018). (Jabin Botsford for The Washington Post)
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Proximity to a Metro station is an important factor in where many renters choose to live in the Washington region.

For some, Metro serves as the link to work but for other renters living near a Metro station provides access to social life, cultural activities and entertainment. While transportation is important, an affordable rent is also essential.

RentHop, an apartment search platform, recently analyzed the patterns in rental apartments around each Metro stop in the D.C. area. Rents rose compared with last year near some stations and dropped near others.

In addition, the company looked at what a difference it could make to look for an apartment one Metro stop away from your preferred location. In some cases, renters could save more than $1,000 on rent for the average one-bedroom apartment. Of course, while RentHop looked at one-bedroom apartments, it didn’t include other variables such as the size or age of the apartment or typical building amenities, all of which affect the rent as much or more than location.

Questions to ask when touring apartments

Generally, RentHop’s analysis found the median rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the area rose 2.4 percent from 2018 to 2019. When analyzing by Metro stop, the company found rent increased at 65 stops, compared with 50 in 2018. Rents dropped at apartments near 19 stops (compared with 35 stops in 2018). Five stops saw no change in median rents.

Here’s where RentHop found the biggest savings between two adjacent Metro stops:

  • Renters on the Orange line can save $1,125 by moving from Stadium-Armory (where the median rent for a one-bedroom is $2,300) to Minnesota Avenue (where the median rent for a one-bedroom is $1,175).
  • Renters on the Green line can save $947 by moving from Navy Yard-Ball Park ($2,200) to Anacostia ($1,253).
  • Renters on the Blue and Silver lines can save $923 by moving from Stadium-Armory ($2,300) to Benning Road ($1,377).
  • Renters on the Orange line can save $400 by moving from East Falls Church ($2,000) to West Falls Church ($1,600).
  • Renters on the Green and Yellow lines can save $325 by moving from U Street ($2,225) to Columbia Heights ($1,900).

Here are the stops with the biggest decrease in median rent for a one-bedroom unit:

  • Apartments near the Rhode Island Avenue stop on the Red Line with a median rent of $1,995 dropped 7.2 percent compared to 2018.
  • Those near Addison Road on the Blue and Silver lines with median rent of $1,120 dropped 6.7 percent.
  • Those near Twinbrook on the Red line with a median rent of $1,650 dropped 6 percent.
  • Those near Gallery Place on the Green, Red and Yellow lines with a median rent of $2,350 dropped 4.1 percent.
  • Those near Morgan Boulevard on the Blue and Silver lines with a median rent of $1,200 dropped 4 percent.
  • Those near Waterfront on the Green line with a median rent of $2,225 dropped 3.3 percent.

Here are the stops where median rents for a one-bedroom apartment increased the most since last year:

  • Apartments near Farragut North on the Red line with a $2,550 median rent rose 10.9 percent since last year.
  • Those near Benning Road on the Blue and Silver lines with a median rent of $1,377 rose 8.4 percent.
  • Those near Southern Avenue on the Green line with a median rent of $1,227 rose 7.9 percent.
  • Those near Arlington Cemetery on the Blue line with a median rent of $2,000 rose 7.8 percent.
  • Those near Dupont Circle on the Red line with a median rent of $2,285 rose 7.5 percent.
  • Those near Minnesota Avenue on the Orange line with a median rent of $1,175 rose 6.8 percent.

For the full analysis, click here.

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