Workplace strikes are surging. Here’s why they won’t stop anytime soon.

Economists say the walkouts could contribute to near-term inflation but, over time, fundamentally change the economic standing of millions of workers.

A group of John Deere workers picket outside of the John Deere Davenport Works facility on Oct. 15 in Davenport, Iowa. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Factory workers, nurses and school bus drivers are among the tens of thousands of Americans who walked off jobs in October amid a surge of labor activism that economists and labor leaders have dubbed “Striketober.”

The strike drives, experts say, stem from the new leverage workers hold in the nation’s tight job market: Having seen the massive profits their companies collected during the coronavirus pandemic, they want their contributions acknowledged in the form of better pay and working conditions.

While work stoppages may contribute to near-term inflation and production tie-ups, economists say they could fundamentally change the economic standing of millions of workers. Here’s what you need to know about the tide of recent strikes.

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