President Donald Trump is unhappy that the U.S. Federal Reserve under the chairman he chose, Jerome Powell, raised interest rates. But while the president can authorize military operations, issue rules by executive order, convene Congress and pardon criminals, he can’t do much about the Fed. That doesn’t mean Trump isn’t trying.

  • Matthew Boesler and Laurence Arnold | Bloomberg
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Jet Airways India Ltd., once ranked the nation’s biggest airline by market value, is on life support. A bailout plan proposed by its lenders is in limbo, it grounded its fleet (at least temporarily), staff salaries are delayed and it’s missed payments to banks and leasing companies. The clock is ticking for one of the country’s most visible companies at a sensitive time, with India’s general election under way. Jet Airways’ survival is hinging on whether investors can be found to take on its los

  • Anurag Kotoky and P R Sanjai | Bloomberg
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Five years after deadly street protests toppled Ukraine’s Kremlin-backed leader, voters are offering their verdict on what’s happened since. A first round of presidential elections left President Petro Poroshenko facing an April 21 runoff against the country’s most-watched comedian, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, a political novice. Polls show that Poroshenko, weighed down by plunging popularity amid a geopolitical tug-of-war that has reignited Cold War tensions, will lose. The anti-establishment mood tha

  • Andrew Langley | Bloomberg
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You’re a criminal with millions of dollars in ill-gotten gains but one big problem: Transferring slugs of money or carrying suitcases of cash will raise eyebrows. You need to “launder” the dough — make the dirty money appear to be the proceeds of legitimate enterprise. Then it can be spent anywhere in the world — say, on real estate or luxury yachts — no questions asked. Most countries and all the world’s major banks have controls in place to flag suspicious funds coming into the financial syste

  • Alexander Weber, Boris Groendahl and Nicholas Comfort | Bloomberg
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In a bold stroke, Maduro’s opponents have declared his government invalid and one of their own his replacement.

  • Patricia Laya | Bloomberg
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So-called sanctuary cities, which refuse to comply with U.S. immigration-enforcement efforts, have been a target of President Donald Trump virtually since the day he took office. By executive order, he threatened to block federal funding to such jurisdictions. Now he says immigrants in the U.S. without authorization will be “given” to sanctuary cities once they no longer can be detained.

  • Jordan Yadoo | Bloomberg
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While China has some of the world’s biggest technology companies, many are listed in the U.S. and Hong Kong. First, there was a push to lure companies back with so-called Chinese depositary receipts, which would allow domestic investors to hold overseas-listed Chinese shares. Now, President Xi Jinping is touting the launch of a new trading venue in Shanghai that will make it easier for high-tech companies to access funding. The new bourse will relax rules on listing and trading, moves that Chine

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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Since December, a truce has kept the trade war between the world’s two biggest economies from escalating. Under the agreement between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, the U.S. postponed indefinitely a threatened increase, to 25 percent from 10 percent, in tariffs on almost half the goods it buys from China, worth some $200 billion. American and Chinese officials have been negotiating since then. The dispute has already shaken the world economy and caused companies to

  • Enda Curran | Bloomberg
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The resignation of Algeria’s ailing, octogenarian president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, after 20 years in office failed to quell mass protests that have evoked comparisons to the Arab Spring of 2011. Algeria is not only one of Africa’s largest energy producers and a major supplier to Europe, but has also been a bulwark against Islamist militancy and undocumented migration from other parts of the continent.

  • Salma El Wardany | Bloomberg
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Two historic summits between the U.S. and North Korea resulted in no concrete plans to end Pyongyang’s atomic ambitions. 

  • Jon Herskovitz and Youkyung Lee | Bloomberg
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One of the biggest hurdles facing digital currencies is their extreme volatility. Bitcoin once dropped from nearly $20,000 to around $6,000 in four months -- a range of price swings that makes it nearly unusable for real-life transactions. For some, the answer is a stable cryptocurrency, or stablecoin. The best-known example, Tether, has been trading since 2015. But stablecoins are about to go mainstream. Facebook Inc. is working on one for use inside the social network’s WhatsApp messenger, whi

  • Matthew Leising and Olga Kharif | Bloomberg
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China pledged in late 2017 to allow overseas financial firms greater access to the world’s second-largest economy. Then came the trade war with the U.S., raising concerns that President Xi Jinping could retaliate by going back on his vow. Xi says the opening is steadily widening. The take-up by foreign companies is gathering pace but concerns linger.

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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When the African National Congress (ANC) swept to power under Nelson Mandela in South Africa’s first multiracial elections a quarter century ago, its campaign slogan assured “a better life for all.” That vision, already somewhat faded, was badly tarnished during the nine-year presidency of Jacob Zuma, which was characterized by scandal, corruption and economic stagnation. Cyril Ramaphosa, who succeeded Zuma in February 2018, is cleaning house — but it could take years to undo the damage to Afric

  • Michael Cohen | Bloomberg
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The Silk Road conjures images of desert caravans crossing the Great Steppe and adventurers like Marco Polo navigating ancient trading routes connecting China with Europe and Africa. China’s modern-day adaptation, known as the Belt and Road Initiative, aims to revive and extend those routes via networks of upgraded or new railways, ports, pipelines, power grids and highways. President Xi Jinping champions his signature project as a means to spur development, goodwill and economic integration. Cr

  • David Tweed | Bloomberg
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As fighting in Libya encroaches on the capital, Tripoli, the risk of new oil-supply outages from the OPEC member has risen. The country has been in disarray since Muammar Qaddafi, its head of state, was removed from office and killed in 2011. Oil output surged in recent months as a fragile peace took hold, but the latest battles are a reminder that reliable crude flows require a political solution to end eight years of strife.

  • Salma El Wardany | Bloomberg
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