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The death in September of a young woman in police custody after she was detained for violating Iran’s strict dress code has sparked violent protests across the country. Popular anger was focused initially on the so-called Guidance Patrol -- officers who target women they deem to be improperly dressed in public -- but soon broadened to encompass decades-long grievances toward the government generally. Unlike previous protests, the current demonstrations have unified people over class and ethnic l

  • Golnar Motevalli | Bloomberg
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While U.S. President Joe Biden has left the door open for discussions on eliminating North Korea’s nuclear weapons, leader Kim Jong Un has shown no interest in picking up again. 

  • Jon Herskovitz | Bloomberg
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Money from foreign investors has been pouring into the $1 trillion Indian government debt market since August, defying a global rout in bonds as expectations rise that India could finally be added to emerging market indexes compiled by JPMorgan Chase & Co. and others. Inclusion would be a milestone for India, which historically restricted access to foreigners, fearing the vagaries of “hot money.” If it happens, overseas investors would have a new way to put money into a giant economy that of

  • Vrishti Beniwal and Ronojoy Mazumdar | Bloomberg
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When the World Wide Web opened for public use in 1991, its enthusiasts proclaimed a new era of unfiltered free expression. That was before the internet in general, and social media platforms in particular, proved to be such effective places to spread misinformation about important matters such as Covid-19 and vaccines, disinformation (intentional falsehoods) about politics and elections, plus all manner of conspiracy theories and hate speech. Social media platforms have faced enormous scrutiny o

  • Maxwell Adler and Sarah Frier | Bloomberg
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Brazil’s first-round presidential election on Sunday pits two larger-than-life figures representing opposite ends of the political spectrum: the incumbent, Jair Bolsonaro, and Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who ruled the country from 2003 to 2010. While there are nine other contenders in the race, none has a realistic chance of winning. The election outcome will have profound implications for Latin America’s biggest and most populous nation.

  • Simone Iglesias | Bloomberg
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Having reclaimed power in Myanmar after a brief period of limited democracy, the military continued to clamp down on civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her party.

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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More than a decade after the US, European and Arab governments helped Libyans to overthrow their tyrannical ruler Moammar Al Qaddafi, the country remains beset by periodic crises and bloodshed. United Nations-backed efforts to reconcile the oil-rich nation’s two competing governments have stalled. And war in Ukraine is pushing Libya’s plight down the international agenda, draining impetus from the peace process. All the while, basic public services are fraying and living standards declining amid

  • Salma El Wardany | Bloomberg
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Money from foreign investors has been pouring into the $1 trillion Indian government debt market since August, defying a global rout in bonds as expectations rise that India could finally be added to emerging market indexes compiled by FTSE Russell, JPMorgan Chase & Co. and others. Inclusion would be a milestone for India, which historically restricted access to foreigners, fearing the vagaries of “hot money.” If it happens, overseas investors would have a new way to put money into a giant e

  • Vrishti Beniwal and Ronojoy Mazumdar | Bloomberg
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An investment strategy used by UK pension funds to protect themselves from falling yields in the government bond market has been blamed for backfiring when they surged instead. Funds following a so-called liability-driven investment, or LDI, strategy were forced to post more collateral when prices for UK sovereign bonds, known as gilts, collapsed suddenly -- driven largely by their own selling. That prompted the Bank of England to step in to prevent a death spiral and a systemic crash.

  • Loukia Gyftopoulou and Greg Ritchie | Bloomberg
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Brazil’s presidential election in October has become a riveting head-to-head contest between two larger-than-life figures representing opposite ends of the political spectrum: the incumbent, Jair Bolsonaro, and Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who ruled the country from 2003 to 2010. While there are nine other contenders in the race, none has a realistic chance of winning. The election outcome will have profound implications for Latin America’s biggest and most-populous nation.

  • Simone Iglesias | Bloomberg
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Having reclaimed power in Myanmar after a brief period of limited democracy, the military continued to clamp down on civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her party.

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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Many hurricanes grow weaker as they approach land. But Hurricane Ian, like Hurricane Ida last year and a string of other recent hurricanes, did the opposite: Its top winds suddenly grew stronger as the storm neared Cuba, jumping from 65 miles (105 kilometers) per hour to 100 mph in less than a day. Meteorologists call that kind of dramatic shift “rapid intensification” -- and say that climate change appears to be making it more common.

  • Leslie Kaufman, Brian K. Sullivan and David R. Baker | Bloomberg
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Russia’s recognition of Ukraine’s separatist Donetsk and Luhansk People’s Republics was the precursor to President Vladimir Putin’s Feb. 24 invasion of the country, and extending its control of those areas has since become his primary goal. Parts of the two eastern provinces, known collectively as the Donbas, have been effectively under Russian control since the Kremlin fomented and supported a separatist uprising in 2014. Now they are the main battlefield for Europe’s biggest armed conflict sin

  • Marc Champion | Bloomberg
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Britain’s most radical package of tax cuts since 1972, combined with plans for large-scale borrowing, have taken financial markets by surprise and triggered a slump in the pound to a record low. The unorthodox measures are designed to kick-start economic growth. Yet the mini-budget unveiled on Sept. 23 raised fears that it could exacerbate inflation, undermine state finances and even cause a full-scale run on the currency, putting pressure on the central bank to step in.

  • Guy Collins | Bloomberg
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Not since the reign of the country’s founder, Abdulaziz Al Saud, has so much power been concentrated in one man’s hands in Saudi Arabia. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman isn’t king, yet. But the 37-year-old royal essentially runs the country for his father, King Salman bin Abdulaziz, who is 86. The prince, who replaced his father as prime minister in late September, leapfrogged a generation of older uncles and cousins to become heir to the throne in one of the world’s last remaining absolute mon

  • Mark Williams | Bloomberg
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Many hurricanes grow weaker as they approach land. But Hurricane Ian, like Hurricane Ida last year and a string of other recent hurricanes, did the opposite: Its top winds suddenly grew stronger as the storm neared Cuba, jumping from 65 miles (105 kilometers) per hour to 100 mph in less than a day. Meteorologists call that kind of dramatic shift “rapid intensification” -- and say that climate change appears to be making it more common.

  • Leslie Kaufman, Brian K. Sullivan and David R. Baker | Bloomberg
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The Bank of England’s role has been in flux ever since it was founded in 1694 to fund a war with France. Its main job these days is to keep prices in check, something it has largely achieved since being handed control over interest rates 25 years ago. Lately, however, it’s struggled to deal with the shocks unleashed by the pandemic and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. BOE policy makers came under further pressure when a new government said it intended to review the bank’s mandate, then unleashed a

  • Andrew Atkinson | Bloomberg
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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is not the only politician who doesn’t like it when the country’s banks charge people relatively heavily to borrow money. What sets him apart is his unorthodox belief in low interest rates and determination to wrest control of monetary policy from central bankers. The result: A succession of benchmark rate cuts that has fueled runaway inflation and precipitated a collapse in the currency.

  • Onur Ant and Ugur Yilmaz | Bloomberg
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Barring any surprises, Italy is on track to have its first far-right prime minister, following the collapse of Prime Minister Mario Draghi’s government. Elections are scheduled for Sunday -- the first to be held since constitutional changes were adopted that shrank the size of the two parliamentary chambers. It also comes as the euro area’s third-largest economy -- and one of its most indebted -- is contending with the fallout of soaring energy prices, rising interest rates and Russia’s invasion

  • Marco Bertacche | Bloomberg
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The crushingly complex, high-stakes business of making semiconductors has always been a battle between global giants. Now it’s also a race among governments. These critical bits of technology — also known as integrated circuits or, more commonly, just chips — may be the tiniest yet most exacting products ever manufactured. And because they’re so difficult and costly to produce, there’s a worldwide reliance on just a handful of companies. That dependence has been brought into stark relief by shor

  • Ian King and Debby Wu | Bloomberg
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