Vaccines have done more than any other medical innovation to save lives and improve health. Yet the persistent and incorrect belief by a minority of parents that immunizations are more dangerous than beneficial is undermining those advances. The anti-vaccine movement that first took hold in the U.S. and parts of Europe is now spreading globally, with the World Health Organization including “vaccine hesitancy” in its Top 10 list of health threats for 2019. At a time when 3 million people worldwi

  • Michelle Cortez | Bloomberg
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From the very start of his campaign for the U.S. presidency, Donald Trump has passionately promoted construction of a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. He remains determined to get something built, even if it’s not as vast as he once envisaged, or made of concrete as he used to describe it, or financed by Mexico as he famously promised his supporters. Ever since Mexico refused to foot the bill, the wall’s funding has been ensnared in budget negotiations with the U.S. Congress that forced

  • Mark Niquette | Bloomberg
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U.S. President Donald Trump’s threat to more than double American tariffs on Chinese goods if an agreement isn’t reached by March 1 would escalate a bruising trade war that’s shaken the world economy and caused companies to reconfigure their supply chains.

  • Enda Curran | Bloomberg
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A dispute that divided Balkan neighbors for more than seven decades, over what constitutes “Macedonia,” has finally reached a resolution. The Republic of Macedonia agreed to rename itself the Republic of North Macedonia to assuage complaints from Greece. In turn, Greece dropped its opposition to plans by the former Yugoslav state to join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union. That has paved the way for the two alliances to expand in a region that was traditionally in Russ

  • Eleni Chrepa and Slav Okov | Bloomberg
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Latin America’s largest economy, Brazil, is at a crossroads. Fixing its public finances could open the door to a virtuous cycle of expansion; failing that, it risks slipping deeper into junk-level credit ratings and sub-par growth. The only way out is to overhaul a costly pension system, economists agree. President Jair Bolsonaro’s economic team led by Economy Minister Paulo Guedes revealed a proposal on Feb. 14 that hopes to satisfy investor demands for belt-tightening while still winning appro

  • Rachel Gamarski and Simone Iglesias | Bloomberg
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Tensions between India and Pakistan are escalating once again. India has blamed Pakistan for a Feb. 14 terrorist attack on security forces in Kashmir that killed dozens of paramilitary troops. The suicide attack was the worst incident of violence since India elected Narendra Modi in 2014 and took place in the run-up to a tightly contested general election due by May. It’s the latest blowup between two of the world’s nuclear-armed nations. While Pakistan denied responsibility, Modi has pledged a

  • Iain Marlow | Bloomberg
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Scoring the most points or unlocking more exciting stages in a video game used to require practice and patience. Today, gamers can often skip the grind and pay to get ahead by buying so-called loot boxes -- virtual vaults containing items such as tokens, better weapons or faster cars. As the popularity of loot boxes grows, so does the controversy over whether they offer an unfair competitive advantage to the wealthiest players. Worse, some critics contend that loot boxes constitute a form of gam

  • Nate Lanxon | Bloomberg
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The smooth transfer of personal data between the European Union and the U.K. — from bank details to your Uber bill — is vital for almost every British business. The U.K. is intent on maintaining that relationship after Brexit, but the EU is making no promises that data-privacy rules will remain as they are.

  • Giles Turner | Bloomberg
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Another acquisitive Chinese company is wobbling. Less than five years old, China Minsheng Investment Group Corp. has spent more than $4 billion on investments and amassed $34 billion of debt, but recently almost failed to make a bond repayment. CMIG joins the likes of HNA Group Co. and Anbang Insurance Group Co. in struggling to repay debt after embarking on a spending spree. At a time when China’s economy is slowing, the group’s troubles are under particular scrutiny, not least since -- in comm

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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A government shutdown that lasted 35 days did not get U.S. President Donald Trump the $5.7 billion he wants for a wall on the Mexico border. In the wake of a deal that re-opened the government temporarily, White House aides said that if Democrats wouldn’t support a wall Trump might bypass Congress entirely by declaring a national emergency. When Congressional negotiators reached a compromise longer-term deal that also didn’t give him the wall money he wanted, Trump said that he would sign the bi

  • Justin Sink, Christopher Flavelle and Ari Natter | Bloomberg
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Buried in the Republican tax overhaul that President Donald Trump signed into law in late 2017 are incentives for investors who fund businesses or develop real estate in new “opportunity zones.” Banks, private equity firms, insurance companies and wealthy individuals are rushing to take advantage. Critics have raised questions about whether the tax breaks will spur development in places that really need it or just stimulate growth in communities that were destined to see investment anyway. Amazo

  • Noah Buhayar | Bloomberg
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What do you do about lab-made chemicals that are in 99 percent of people in the U.S. and have been linked to immune system problems and cancer? Whose bonds are so stable that they’re often called “forever chemicals”? Meet PFAS, a class of chemicals that some scientists call the next PCB or DDT. For consumers, they are best known in products like Scotchgard and Teflon. For businesses, PFAS are a puzzle that has already created billions of dollars worth of liabilities. But 70 years of unchecked pr

  • Tiffany Kary | Bloomberg
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If you like watching videos on YouTube or reading news posted on Facebook -- and you happen to live in Europe -- your online experience is in for some changes starting this year. The European Union agreed on Feb. 13 to overhaul its copyright rules for the internet age to ensure fair compensation for artists and publishers. While content creators welcome the effort as overdue and well-intentioned, the law has sparked controversy and could unleash a host of unintended consequences.

  • Natalia Drozdiak | Bloomberg
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Almost every Nigerian vote since independence in 1960 has been dogged by varying degrees of conflict and allegations of rigging. That’s one reason why the 2015 election that saw Muhammadu Buhari, now 76, become the first candidate in the nation’s history to topple a sitting president through the ballot box was such a watershed moment. But the former military ruler has presided over four years of lackluster growth and fallen short on a pledge to quell rampant corruption. His critics nicknamed him

  • Dulue Mbachu | Bloomberg
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Airbus SE took the drastic measure of terminating its flagship A380 superjumbo, with the last double-deckers rolling off the production line in 2021. That will be just 14 years after its first commercial flight and just a year after Airbus appeared to have secured the aircraft’s long-term future with a much-needed order from Emirates. But its biggest customer had second thoughts and pared back its commitment, leaving Airbus with no choice but to scrap the program.

  • Christopher Jasper | Bloomberg
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