Blackouts have had South Africans firing up candles, flashlights and generators as crisis-plagued Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd., which provides most of the country’s electricity, struggles to meet demand. The state-owned company took almost 10 percent of its generation capacity offline in recent weeks to prevent the collapse of the national grid, a consequence of construction problems at two new plants and years of deferred maintenance. But Eskom’s problems run far deeper. It’s mired in debt and isn’t

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Carlos Ghosn was a jet-setting captain of industry, the brash superhero who helped save both Renault SA and Nissan Motor Co. To the shock of many, on Nov. 19 he was arrested in Japan and has been detained ever since in a murky case involving his personal finances, with no release date in sight. Ghosn’s alleged conduct is not the only thing under scrutiny. So is Japan’s legal system and its near-perfect conviction rate.

  • Lisa Du and Kaye Wiggins | Bloomberg
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As U.S. Democrats lay the foundation of their bid to unseat President Donald Trump in 2020, raising taxes on the rich is emerging as a central theme for a party being pulled to the left by its invigorated self-described progressive wing. Ideas include a “wealth tax” on assets, much higher income tax rates on the biggest earners and a new tax on financial trades, all in the name of raising more money for new government programs while making a dent in rising inequality.

  • Laura Davison | Bloomberg
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Satellites make much of modern warfare possible, through GPS systems, wireless communications and sophisticated weather forecasting. This makes them tempting military targets. The U.S. Air Force has been responsible for defending American satellites and spacecraft. President Donald Trump said in 2018 that the perils required a new military branch, an idea that came to be known as the Space Force. The idea was popular with crowds at the president’s rallies, but not with Pentagon officials or many

  • Justin Bachman and Travis Tritten | Bloomberg
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Wirecard AG’s shares have whipsawed this year after a series of reports alleging irregularities at the payment company’s Singapore unit. Wirecard has repeatedly denied wrongdoing, but investors remain jittery. The whole situation is so volatile that authorities halted short sales of the stock, and brokerage Keefe, Bruyette & Woods suspended its coverage of the company, saying it can’t come to an informed investment opinion given all the noise. Authorities from Singapore to Germany are invest

  • Stefan Nicola | Bloomberg
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A decade after Zimbabwe scrapped its own currency to end hyperinflation and began using mainly the U.S. dollar, the economy is back in free fall. Fuel, medicines and other basics are hard to come by and less than 10 percent of the workforce is formally employed. While the new currency regime initially helped stabilize prices, it also increased imports, curtailed exports and gave rise to a chronic shortage of banknotes. To fund government spending and help ease the liquidity crisis, the central b

  • Mike Cohen and Lisa Beyer | Bloomberg
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The fate of around 1,020 people living in refugee camps on remote South Pacific islands is set to add fuel to Australia’s already heated federal election campaign. No sooner had legislators passed a new law on Feb. 13 that gives doctors more say over when asylum seekers should be sent to Australia for medical treatment than Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that the country’s border security was at risk, and that a fresh wave of would-be refugees would head for Australian shores. The issue

  • Jason Scott | Bloomberg
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Some 3,000 of the most powerful officials in China are preparing for the annual parliamentary pageantry known as the National People’s Congress. Although it’s China’s main legislature, the ruling Communist Party ensures that important decisions are made long before any proposals reach the floor. Still, the public proceedings over 10 days in Beijing offer a rare chance for thousands of journalists from around the world to hear from and interact with the people involved in running the world’s seco

  • Karen Leigh | Bloomberg
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Debt-ravaged Jet Airways India Ltd., the country’s biggest so-called full-service airline, is selling a majority stake for 1 rupee -- a little more than 1 U.S. cent. It’s part of a bailout plan by its state-owned lenders that will give the airline time to arrange fresh equity. The complicated arrangement is on track to be voted through on Feb. 21, in what would represent the rescue of one of the country’s most visible companies at a sensitive time, with India’s general election just weeks away.

  • Anurag Kotoky | Bloomberg
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It’s a high-yield investment with a hand grenade attached. An asset carried gingerly with the hope that it won’t explode, leaving investors in a hole. Welcome to a class of securities that’s all the rage in Europe: contingent convertibles, also known as CoCo bonds. A cross between a bond and a stock, CoCos are helping banks bolster capital to meet tougher regulation designed to prevent a repeat of the taxpayer bailouts of the financial crisis. Some investors are skeptical that the extra yield Co

  • Thomas Beardsworth and John Glover | Bloomberg
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North Korea need not look far for lessons on how to modernize its dilapidated economy. Neighbors China and South Korea have both transformed from agrarian backwaters into global manufacturing powerhouses in the space of several decades. Yet Kim Jong Un’s regime is also seeking counsel from another country thousands of kilometers away, one that also shares an acrimonious history with the U.S. -- Vietnam. Kim, who’s reported to have discussed Vietnam-style reform during a meeting with his South Ko

  • Jungah Lee, John Boudreau, Nguyen Dieu Tu Uyen and Michelle Jamrisko | Bloomberg
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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has reason to feel less confident about the coming general election than he once might have. His popularity has suffered as a result of declining confidence in the economy -- something his government helped engineer via a chaotically implemented sales tax and the sudden withdrawal of most bank notes from circulation. More recently, state election defeats and the surprise resignation of India’s top central banker have dealt Modi some high-profile blows, prompti

  • Iain Marlow | Bloomberg
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U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is still trying to negotiate a Brexit deal with the European Union that can get through the British Parliament. But as March 29, or Brexit day, approaches, Britain’s financial industry and its regulators have also been preparing for a sudden exit from the EU without an accord or transition period -- a so-called no-deal Brexit. Here’s the good news: The U.K. and EU have been rolling out contingency plans to smooth the business of banking and securities trading and

  • Alexander Weber and Silla Brush | Bloomberg
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President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal created a sprawling range of public-works programs to address the Great Depression. Eighty years later, some present-day members of his party say a program no less grand in scope is needed to address a new crisis -- the existential threat of global warming. A band of self-described progressive Democrats energized by the party’s successes in last year’s midterm elections have unveiled a wish list of government actions they’ve packaged as the “Green New D

  • Ari Natter | Bloomberg
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Almost every Nigerian vote since independence in 1960 has been dogged by varying degrees of conflict and allegations of rigging. That’s one reason why the 2015 election that saw Muhammadu Buhari, now 76, become the first candidate in the nation’s history to topple a sitting president through the ballot box was such a watershed moment. But the former military ruler has presided over four years of lackluster growth and fallen short on a pledge to quell rampant corruption. His critics nicknamed him

  • Dulue Mbachu | Bloomberg
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