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The rise of global technology superstars Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google created new challenges for the competition watchdogs who enforce antitrust laws.

  • David McLaughlin | Bloomberg
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Germany’s Greens party has come a long way from the radical fringe group of the 1980s, moving into the mainstream and appealing to a wider swath of voters backing policies for tackling climate change. It has helped shape Germany’s exit from nuclear power and pushed for Europe’s industrial powerhouse to become a world leader in hydrogen technology. Now, it heads into the Sept. 26 election in a strong position to be part of the next coalition government, and perhaps even to lead it.

  • Stefan Nicola | Bloomberg
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It’s well over two years since a standoff began between Juan Guaido, the opposition figure recognized by the U.S. as Venezuela’s legitimate leader, and President Nicolas Maduro, the leftist in charge during one of the deepest economic collapses in modern history. While Guaido has not officially abandoned his claim, there’s no longer any doubt: he lost and Maduro has won. As international support around Guaido weakens, he and some segments of the opposition are raising the prospect of negotiating

  • Alex Vasquez | Bloomberg
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Ever since Bitcoin was launched as the world’s first cryptocurrency, its proponents have made big claims about its power to upend financial systems and change the very nature of money. But a simpler question has remained maddeningly unresolved -- can it work in the real world, for the mundane matters of buying and selling things and transferring money? El Salvador’s announcement that it will consider Bitcoin legal tender may give an answer.

  • Michael McDonald and Matthew Bristow | Bloomberg
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California, the most populous U.S. state, is on track to hold an election later this year on recalling its governor. The effort to remove Democrat Gavin Newsom from office began before the pandemic but was fueled by his actions during it. A similar recall effort in 2003 succeeded in ousting California’s then-governor, Gray Davis, and former bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzennegger, a Republican, emerged from a pack of candidates as California’s new leader. That history gives outnumbered Cali

  • Tiffany Stecker | Bloomberg
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While early arrangements to secure supplies of Covid-19 vaccines are paying off for the likes of Israel, Britain, the U.S., and the European Union, its relatively sluggish rollout notwithstanding, much of the world is still waiting for anything beyond a trickle of the life-saving doses. Public health specialists warn that uneven access to the vaccines will prolong the pandemic, bringing more suffering and economic pain in a way that exacerbates global inequality.

  • James Paton and Todd Gillespie | Bloomberg
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An incumbent superpower and a rising one are finding coexistence increasingly difficult. Jockeying for position in a changing world, the U.S. and China are facing off on all sorts of issues: economic, military and political. “The period that was broadly described as engagement has come to an end,” U.S. President Joe Biden’s top Asia adviser declared. Now, “the dominant paradigm is going to be competition.” Here’s a rundown of flashpoints, some with significant consequences and others that for no

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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China’s private education companies have for years been the darlings of investors from New York to Shanghai, building a $100 billion industry on the promise of the world’s largest and arguably most-competitive schooling system. Then suddenly they got caught up in the Chinese government’s sweeping efforts to rein in the country’s technology giants. The regulatory clampdown, ostensibly in the name of consumer protection, has walloped listed companies and forced startups with big-name backers like

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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  • Analysis

Ever since Bitcoin was launched as the world’s first cryptocurrency, its proponents have made big claims about its power to upend financial systems and change the very nature of money. But a simpler question has remained maddeningly unresolved -- can it work in the real world, for the mundane matters of buying and selling things and transferring money? El Salvador’s announcement that it will consider Bitcoin legal tender may give an answer.

  • Michael McDonald and Matthew Bristow | Bloomberg
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The #MeToo movement cast a cloud over corporate America’s penchant for secrecy on sexual harassment complaints. Some companies are embracing sunshine as an antidote. Tech titans Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Uber and some large law firms moved as early as 2018 to do away with contract clauses that forced employees to air their complaints in closed-door arbitration rather than in public. Movement in the financial sector has been slower, but Wells Fargo revised its policy in 2020 and Goldman Sac

  • Peter Blumberg | Bloomberg
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You don’t hear much about content-delivery networks, or CDNs, until they stop delivering. A global outage of major websites on June 8 that lasted about an hour was caused by problems at the San Francisco-based Fastly Inc. It took down websites including the New York Times, Bloomberg News, Reddit Inc. and even the U.K. government.

  • Nate Lanxon | Bloomberg
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If all goes as planned, one of the world’s poorest countries will be transformed by Africa’s biggest-ever private investment splurge, but there’s a problem. Attacks by Islamist insurgents threaten hopes of exploiting huge natural gas deposits off Mozambique’s northern coast. More than 2,800 people have been killed and 700,000 displaced since violence began in 2017. The country’s export ambitions are linked to projects by some of the world’s biggest energy companies, but investments are being hel

  • Matthew Hill and Paul Burkhardt | Bloomberg
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Russia, Iran, China and the U.S. are among the world’s leading practitioners of cyberwarfare -- state-on-state hacking to gain strategic or military advantage by disrupting or destroying data or physical infrastructure. Unlike combat with bullets and bombs, cyberwarfare is waged almost entirely with stealth and subterfuge, so it’s hard to know when and where it’s occurring, or whether full-scale cyberwar is on the horizon.

  • Jordan Robertson and Laurence Arnold | Bloomberg
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Please have more babies. That’s China’s message for couples after decades of limiting most families to just one child. Why the turnabout? China is aging. China’s working-age population has been shrinking, and projections show that one quarter of the population will be 60 or older by 2030. This threatens an economic boom that’s been built on a vast labor supply, and there may not be enough able-bodied people to take care of all those seniors. Policy makers are increasingly concerned that drastic

  • Bloomberg News | Bloomberg
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Multinational companies have long used creative but legal ways to shrink their tax bills. One is to book profits from customers in places like Boston and Berlin as if they came from, say, Bermuda, which has no corporate income tax. The world’s richest economies have agreed to jointly pursue a revamp of the global tax system that would undercut the effectiveness of such a strategy.

  • Laura Davison and Isabel Gottlieb | Bloomberg
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When every major music-streaming provider offers the same catalog of songs from almost all of recorded music’s history, how can they compete? One way is on price, such as Spotify Technology SA’s free, ad-supported tier; another is to bundle other products, like Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime. But a more technology-based approach is to make the music itself sound better, and Apple Inc. is venturing into this territory with its lossless, high-resolution, and spatial audio.

  • Nate Lanxon | Bloomberg
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Millions of people who have gotten Covid-19 and survived are finding that a full recovery can be frustratingly elusive. Weeks and months after seemingly recovering from even a mild case, many patients still confront a wide range of health problems. As researchers try to measure the duration and depth of what’s being called “long Covid,” a burgeoning number of specialized post–acute Covid clinics are opening to handle the patients. The scale of the pandemic means that Covid’s disabling effects --

  • Jason Gale | Bloomberg
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More than a year after Covid-19 touched off the worst pandemic in more than a century, scientists have yet to determine its origins. The closest related viruses to SARS-CoV-2 were found in bats over 1,000 miles from the central Chinese city of Wuhan, where the disease erupted in late 2019. Initially, cases were tied to a fresh food market and possibly the wildlife sold there. An investigation in early 2021 has highlighted the possibility that they acted as a vector, transferring the virus from b

  • Jason Gale | Bloomberg
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Japan’s colonial rule over the Korean Peninsula ended more than seven decades ago, yet that legacy still roils everyday politics.

  • Isabel Reynolds and Youkyung Lee | Bloomberg
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Climate lawyers are preparing to take on more fossil-fuel companies after a Dutch court ordered Royal Dutch Shell Plc to cut its emissions faster than planned, on the grounds that the oil giant is violating human rights by contributing to global warming. It was a turning point for climate court cases, which boomed after the Paris Agreement on global warming was reached in 2015. Initially, many cases challenged governments’ plans, but litigators are increasingly targeting companies.

  • Diederik Baazil and Laura Millan Lombrana | Bloomberg
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