In this Tuesday, June 23, 2015 file photo, English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web, attends the Cannes Lions 2015, International Advertising Festival in Cannes, southern France. Berners-Lee implemented the first successful communication between a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) client and server via the Internet. (Lionel Cironneau, File/Associated Press)

GENEVA — The inventor of the World Wide Web knows his revolutionary innovation is coming of age, and doesn’t always like what he sees: state-sponsored hacking, online harassment, hate speech and misinformation among the ills of its “digital adolescence.”

Tim Berners-Lee issued a cri-de-coeur letter and spoke to a few reporters Monday on the eve of the 30-year anniversary of his first paper with an outline of what would become the web — a first step toward transforming countless lives and the global economy.

The European Organization for Nuclear Research plans to host Berners-Lee and other web aficionados on Tuesday.

Berners-Lee said: “We’re celebrating, but we’re also very concerned.”

Late last year, a key threshold was crossed — roughly half the world has gotten online. Today some 2 billion websites exist.

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