Travel planning



There are some surprising — and instructive — parallels between living through a pandemic and completing a 2,650-mile hike:

  • Dan White
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Organizations are collecting submissions of stories, artwork, photographs and “anything flat” through online portals.

  • Erika Mailman
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Try practicing qi gong with an instructor in Australia. Or go on a local safari to see wildlife that’s roaming more freely.

  • Rachel Chang
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Even after the pandemic is over, it will take a lot to make some customers feel comfortable sailing again.

  • Candyce H. Stapen
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About 98 percent of the trail is open, but many restrooms and overnight shelters remain closed.

Visitors can explore Skyline Drive and hundreds of miles of trails, but not Old Rag.

From Scandinavian aquavit to Chinese baijiu, these national spirits offer a window into cultures around the world.

  • Liza Weisstuch
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For the stir-crazy, even a small change in perspective can be a big boost.

  • Melanie D.G. Kaplan
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Some are friendlier than others. But don’t count on them becoming more generous.

Among the changes are restricted airport access, masked airline agents, floor markers and plastic shields at security checkpoints.

The Post’s ‘Navigator’ columnist finds a landscape both familiar and unfamiliar on a series of flights between Nice, France, and Spokane, Wash.

Visitors will be tested upon arrival and required to download a tracing app.

At accredited big cat sanctuaries across the United States, visitors can learn more about the often exploited animals.

  • Danielle Braff
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Restricted to a one-kilometer radius, a family becomes tourists on their daily walks.

  • Mary Winston Nicklin
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Savvy cities and attractions have launched marketing campaigns urging visitors to stay home — at least for now.

  • Liza Weisstuch
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Caught up short by coronavirus restrictions, many remote workers are reluctantly returning home.

  • Jen Rose Smith
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It helps to have a plan before a crisis. Stay calm and act fast once it’s underway.

From “Parts Unknown” to “Booze Traveler” to “Dark Tourist,” there’s a TV show for armchair travelers of every stripe.

Would-be globe-trotters find ways to cope with disappointment and uncertainty.

  • Diane Daniel
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Find your vision, take an online class, practice in your backyard and plan your next trip.

  • Erin E. Williams
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