First came the picture of Hitler.

The menacing message, sent privately on Facebook, featured the Nazi leader’s face superimposed onto the author’s body, a mash-up both bizarre and deeply disturbing. What it portended was even worse.

Over the next several months, the recipient, a South Florida woman whom law enforcement officials have not identified, was bombarded by more than 150 pages of messages filled with racist threats of violence and murder that were nightmarishly, cartoonishly grotesque.

Meanwhile, authorities say, the sender was also hatching a plan to kidnap his target and transport her across the country, from Miami to Seattle.

On Friday, federal agents arrested Eric Lin, who they say sent the messages and devised the abduction scheme, and charged him with interstate transmission of threatening communications. The 35-year-old from Clarksburg, Md., espoused neo-Nazi rhetoric while threatening to kill both the woman and “all Hispanics in Miami and other places,” prosecutors said.

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“I look forward to committing a ‘Genocide,’” Lin allegedly wrote. “The Time will come when Miami will burn to the Ground — and every Latin Man be lined up against a Wall and shot and every Latin Woman Raped or Cut to pieces.”

Earlier, he allegedly said, typing in all capital letters, “I FOLLOW ONLY ADOLF HITLER AND THEN GOD. THEY ARE ONE AND THE SAME.”

Lin’s string of messages resembles the racist ramblings linked to the man accused of shooting and killing 22 people at a Walmart in El Paso earlier this month. The alleged gunman said he was targeting Hispanics in his attack, which shook the border community and reverberated across the country — a sign, some said, of the dangers of increasingly divisive political rhetoric.

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Prosecutors said Lin peppered his threats with paeans to President Trump, writing on one occasion, “I Thank God everyday President Donald John Trump is President and that he will launch a Racial War and Crusade.”

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Court documents show that a federal public defender, Gregory Geist, is representing Lin. Geist did not respond to a request for comment.

Records indicate that Lin maintained at least two Facebook accounts and used the pseudonyms “Jake Howard” and “Eric A Schopenhauer.” On the latter account, public posts quote Hitler and the Bible and praise Trump. Lin used both screen names to harass the woman and began messaging her in May, authorities said.

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The woman, who is from Spain, said she suspected Lin was the author because he was a frequent patron of the restaurant where she worked and he had made similar comments in person. She said his messages made her frightened for her life and those of her relatives.

In June, using sporadic punctuation and capitalization, Lin wrote, “I will stop at Nothing until you, your family, your friends,, your entire WORTHLESS LATIN RACE IS RACIALLY EXTERMINATED.”

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The next month, he allegedly wrote that “By the Authority of ADOLF HITLER AND GOD I HEREBY DECLARE SPANISH AND SPANISH ALL SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE ILLEGAL.” Three days later, he addressed the woman as “Spaniard” and told her he would cut out her heart and eat her flesh “like eating a Steak.” He used an array of slurs directed at Hispanics, African Americans, Muslims and Jews.

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The woman eventually reported the threats to the Miami Police Department, which passed them onto the FBI in late July. A search warrant turned up a series of Facebook messages between Lin and someone he called “Chris.” Records show that Lin asked him for “a favor.”

“I was wondering if you could go to Miami and beat up” the woman, he wrote in July, using a derogatory term for a Spanish-speaking person. “I can pay you $10,000.”

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But two days later, Lin asked the person to “chain her up and put her in a Rubber made Plastic Bin” before driving her more than 3,000 miles to Seattle.”‘ For this, Lin said, he would pay $25,000.

“I don’t care if I have to Pay you a Million Dollars or More I want this Done!” he allegedly wrote.

He told Chris not to worry, assuring him they wouldn’t get in any real trouble because law enforcement wouldn’t be paying attention.

“I doubt the FBI would care much about her,” Lin said.

A little more than a month later, however, agents had arrested him.

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