Monday, Sept. 16

Eric Andre at the Warner Theatre: Even though the phrase “this comedy might not be for everyone” gets thrown around a lot, it’s generous for the work of Eric Andre. The actor/comedian’s appearance as the voice of Azizi in this year’s remake of “The Lion King” was a surprise, given that his comedy can be less than family-friendly. Andre is best known for his self-titled show on Adult Swim, a beautifully chaotic alchemy of talk-show sendup and “Jackass”-style sketches. For his live standup show, you can probably expect a little of all of the above. 7:30 p.m. $33-$68.75.

Tuesday, Sept. 17

Washington Mystics playoff opener: By any measure, the Washington Mystics have had a season for the ages. They won 26 games, the most in franchise history, and won eight of those by 25 points — the most in WNBA history. Star forward Elena Delle Donne became the first WNBA player to shoot better than 50 percent from the field, 40 percent from the three-point line and 90 percent on free throws. (If you think that’s not a big deal, only eight NBA players, including Larry Bird and Stephen Curry, have hit the 50/40/90 mark.) Following a double-bye in the opening rounds of the playoffs, the Mystics return to the Entertainment and Sports Arena on Tuesday as the league’s No. 1 seed. They play at home for the first two games of the best-of-five semifinal round, as well as a potential Game 5. 8:30 p.m. $23-$44.

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K A G at Black Cat: When she’s not leading the charge as the vocalist for D.C.’s preeminent punks Priests, Katie Alice Greer records and performs as K A G. The solo project is home for Greer’s more unconventional experiments, as she mixes her searing vocals with electronic beats, sample loops and noise of all kinds. Whether she’s singing over skeletal club music or turning the Dixie Chicks’ 1999 album “Fly” into a DIY noise-pop record, Greer gets weird in her own way. As press materials describe one such experiment, “Think Madonna in a Keith Haring dress on a bed in the middle of a warehouse club.” 7:30 p.m. $10.

‘Cats’ at the Kennedy Center: If you were intrigued, rather than frightened, by the CGI-heavy trailer for the new movie version of the classic musical “Cats,” you’re in luck. The national touring version of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical is stopping at the Kennedy Center this fall, well before the movie starring Jennifer Hudson, Idris Elba and Taylor Swift hits theaters in December. The costumes for this show devoted to a feline tribe look as intricate as the movie’s so-called “digital fur technology.” Through Oct. 6. $49-$149.

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Sigrid at 9:30 Club: Last year’s winner of the BBC’s influential “Sound of” poll (past winners include Adele, Ellie Goulding and Haim), Sigrid is the latest pop star to master the kind of pristine, synthesizer pop that Scandinavians have been churning out since ABBA. But for the 23-year-old Norwegian singer-songwriter, a back-to-basics authenticity is key. That’s true on one of her best singles, “Don’t Kill My Vibe,” which reveals more grit than you might expect from a gentle songbird. Though the song was born from a difficult writing session with an older, dismissive songwriter, it’s general enough to serve as an empowerment anthem for youth in revolt everywhere. 7 p.m. Sold out.

Wednesday, Sept. 18

Marina at the Anthem: When it was time to figure out how to present her latest album, Marina Diamandis was drawn to the work of psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. Best known for her model for the five stages of grief, Kubler-Ross also theorized that all human emotions come from either love or fear. With that in mind, Diamandis (who performs under the mononym Marina) named her fourth album “Love + Fear,” splitting the 16 tracks depending on which emotion drove the song’s creation. 7:30 p.m. $45-$75.

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‘Fabulation, or the Re-Education of Undine’ at Atlas Performing Arts Center: Double Dutch jump rope rarely gets its due in drama, but the game inspires a touching moment in “Fabulation, or the Re-Education of Undine,” Lynn Nottage’s satire about upward and downward mobility in contemporary America. Now on view in a mostly sleek Mosaic Theater Company production, “Fabulation” tells of Undine, an African American PR bigwig whose world unravels after her husband absconds with her money. Written in a less naturalistic mode than Nottage’s Pulitzer Prize-winning plays “Sweat” and “Ruined,” but sharing the former’s concerns with America’s socioeconomic and racial fault lines, the 2004 “Fabulation” abounds in biting satirical specificity. Through Sunday. $20-$65.

Brent Cobb at Rock & Roll Hotel: For Brent Cobb, music is a family business: His cousin is Dave Cobb, the Nashville producer who has helmed some of the decade’s best country albums, by such artists as Sturgill Simpson, Chris Stapleton and Jason Isbell. The elder Cobb has also produced Brent’s albums, which are full of songs that bring soul and wit to down-home life. Take “Diggin’ Holes,” where Cobb connects the lyrical dots between digging holes in relationships, hitting rock bottom and leaving town to earthbound jobs like digging for coal, drilling for oil, working on the railroad and toiling in a graveyard. 8 p.m. $18.

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Thursday, Sept. 19

Washington Monument reopens: The Washington Monument is D.C.’s most visible landmark, but earthquake damage, problems with the elevator and construction of a new security screening area have meant that it has been closed for more than five of the past eight years. However, the monument is set to reopen to visitors on Thursday, and this time, the Park Service promises it will actually stay open. For the first month, same-day tickets will be given away on a first-come, first-served basis daily at 8:30 a.m. Tickets for dates after Oct. 19 will be available on recreation.gov. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free.

‘Judy Chicago — The End: A Meditation on Death and Extinction’ at the National Museum of Women in the Arts: Few ways to wind down a career of pioneering feminist art are bolder than titling an exhibition “The End.” But this is right in line with Judy Chicago’s accomplished body of work, which grapples with creation, life and identity. The 80-year-old artist’s latest exhibit features almost 40 works of glass and porcelain, plus two larger bronze sculptures, focusing on the meaning of death as well as the artist’s own mortality. Through Jan. 20, 2020. Free-$10.

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Friday, Sept. 20

End-Of-Summer-Camp at the Smithsonian American Art Museum: Brightest Young Things’ last late-night museum soiree of the year is, fittingly, an end of summer party. The night’s itinerary includes pairings of s’mores and bourbon, a hammock lounge, a drag queen talent show and two DJ sets, including one from Baltimore’s own Dan Deacon. A ticket gets you access to an open bar with cocktails from the likes of Columbia Room and Archipelago — as well as Smirnoff sno-cones. 8:30 p.m. $65.

Octa Octa & Eris Drew at Flash: As DJs and producers, Octo Octa and Eris Drew are masters of emotionally charged house music. Their most recent releases, Drew’s “Raving Disco Breaks Vol. 1” mix tape and Octo Octa’s “Resonant Body” LP, full of classic breakbeats and reminiscent of raves past. Their music has also been revelatory and self-exploratory, especially as they are both trans women who have come out and transitioned in the public eye. The romantic partners and musical collaborators have founded a label that was birthed from the pair’s “love of DJ culture, nature, magic and each other,” and the magic will be in action during this back-to-back DJ set. 10 p.m. $15.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, Chris Kelly and Celia Wren

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