Friday, Sept. 20

“Judy Chicago — The End: A Meditation on Death and Extinction” at the National Museum of Women in the Arts: Few ways to wind down a career of pioneering feminist art are bolder than titling an exhibition “The End.” But this is right in line with Judy Chicago’s accomplished body of work, which grapples with creation, life and identity. The 80-year-old artist’s latest exhibition features nearly 40 works of glass and porcelain, plus two larger bronze sculptures, focusing on the meaning of death as well as the artist’s own mortality. The National Museum of Women in the Arts debuts this exhibition with a talk by Chicago, who will discuss her new book as well as “The End.” (Sunday from 4:30 to 8 p.m., $65-$80.) Through Jan. 20, 2020. Free-$10.

Martyn at DC24: The idea behind this weekend’s DC24 festival is elegant enough. Motley crews of DJs from all across the area — including Juana, Sam “the Man” Burns, DJ Lisa Frank and others — will spin a wild variety of rhythms for 24 hours straight, all love, no interruptions. The metaphorical group-hug might feel especially warm for Martyn, an outlier booked to perform smack in the middle of it all. “The [DJs] that I know in D.C. give off a really familial vibe, and I think that’s something I really need sometimes,” the 45-year-old says. “I’m part of so many different worlds.” DC24 begins at 10 p.m. Martyn performs on Saturday at 3:30 a.m. The venue address will be announced to ticket holders on Friday. $35.

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End-Of-Summer Camp at the Smithsonian American Art Museum: Brightest Young Things’ last late-night museum soiree of the year is, fittingly, an end-of-summer party. The night’s itinerary includes pairings of s’mores and bourbon, a hammock lounge, a drag queen talent show and two DJ sets, including one from Baltimore’s own Dan Deacon. A ticket gets you access to an open bar with cocktails from the likes of Columbia Room and Archipelago — as well as Smirnoff sno-cones. 8:30 p.m. $65.

Octo Octa & Eris Drew at Flash: As DJs and producers, Octo Octa and Eris Drew are masters of emotionally charged house music. Their most recent releases, Drew’s “Raving Disco Breaks Vol. 1” mix tape and Octo Octa’s “Resonant Body” LP, are full of classic breakbeats and reminiscent of raves past. Their music has also been revelatory and self-exploratory, especially as they are both trans women who have come out and transitioned in the public eye. The romantic partners and musical collaborators have founded a label that was birthed from the pair’s “love of DJ culture, nature, magic and each other,” and the magic will be in action during this back-to-back DJ set. 10 p.m. $15.

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Saturday, Sept. 21

H Street Festival and Clarendon Day: When it comes to weather, September is the D.C. area’s Goldilocks season: Not too hot, not too cool. No wonder so many neighborhood festivals take over our streets this month. Two of the area’s biggest take place on the same day. The H Street Festival rapidly evolved into a massive celebration that can draw more than 150,000 people to an 11-block stretch of Northeast Washington. The attractions are legion: multiple stages with go-go, rock and gospel performers; a pie-eating contest; fashion shows for people and canines; art displays; and beer and food gardens hosted by the strip’s bars and restaurants. A few miles west-southwest, Clarendon Day shuts down Wilson and Clarendon boulevards — and a few side streets — for multiple music stages, beer and wine gardens, family-friendly activities, including the Arlington Art Truck, and rooftop parties at the neighborhood’s numerous bars. H Street Festival: noon to 7 p.m. Clarendon Day: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free.

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Oktoberfest at various locations: Oktoberfest kicks off this Saturday in Munich, and many local bars and restaurants — German-themed as well as those that just like beer — will follow suit. The most notable is at Heurich House, where the museum, home of 20th century brewing magnate Christian Heurich, will tap a recreation of Heurich’s Senate Lager, a 1940s flagship beer that was re-created from an old lab report. The $65 Heurich Oktoberfest tickets include unlimited pours of Senate, and beers and ciders from local producers, including Red Bear, Sankofa and Anxo. Navy Yard’s Bluejacket releases the Hill House Fest lager and celebrates by tapping five other German-inspired brews, unveiling a one-day menu including schnitzel sliders and spaetzle, and bringing in a band to play Bavarian tunes. The Berliner Beer Hall in Georgetown has a solid lineup of German beers, but they’re beginning Oktoberfest with a local option: the new Oktoberfest Märzen from Silver Spring’s Silver Branch. The keg is tapped at noon, and the first 24 people to order one receive a brewery tankard. Make sure you pair it with the housemade brats.

Wiener 500 at the Wharf: If most Oktoberfest celebrations blur together in a haze of lederhosen, pretzels and oompah bands, let us introduce you to the Wiener 500, the most singular Oktoberfest celebration in Washington. Dozens of dachshunds race to determine the speediest wiener dog while crowds roar them on, and all the action is shown on a 17-foot screen. (Yes, it’s as hilarious as it sounds.) Outside the sprinting pups, there’s a beer garden, stein-holding competitions, DJs and a doggy costume contest that’s open to all breeds. Proceeds from the event benefit the Humane Rescue Alliance. 1 to 5 p.m. Free.

Museum Day at various locations: Washingtonians sometimes take our free museums for granted — so much so that we might balk at paying admission fees at local museums that aren’t free. The annual Museum Day is a chance to see some of these paid museums for zero dollars. Tickets have already been snatched up for some notable destinations, such as the Museum of the Bible and the Newseum, but you can still use this opportunity to marvel at the grand columns of the National Building Museum or see Judy Chicago’s new exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts without paying a cent. Museum hours vary. Free.

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National Philharmonic at Strathmore: Ever since it changed its name from the Montgomery County Chamber Orchestra, the National Philharmonic has shown its ambitions to compete with the big guys. The largest of the orchestras surveyed here, it performs in the same hall as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and at about the same ticket prices. That’s steep competition, and having to sell so many tickets to a large concert hall also leads to middle-of-the-road programming and a mixture of pops concerts. (This year, one program is devoted to the music of Abba.) This weekend brings a program of all Beethoven compositions. Through Sunday. (Saturday: 8 p.m.; Sunday: 3 p.m.) Free-$79.

Sunday, Sept. 22

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‘Labyrinth’ at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden: If you’ve been to the Hirshhorn in the past few years, you’ve certainly seen the “Big Man.” Or maybe you’ve seen a picture of him slouched in his corner. Well, the sculpture by artist Ron Mueck is leaving the gallery for an undetermined amount of time, so to send him off, the modern art museum is hosting a screening of Jim Henson’s cult classic “Labyrinth” starring David Bowie. Mueck puppeteered and voiced Ludo, the beast who guides Jennifer Connelly’s Sarah on her quest. 2 to 4 p.m. Free.

March on Washington Film Festival: A week of thought-provoking, civil-rights-related films begins with a showing of the acclaimed Aretha Franklin documentary “Amazing Grace” at Washington National Cathedral. The festival, which was founded six years ago to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, is hosting events and screenings throughout the city, including a documentary on former congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, a virtual-reality experience with Oculus VR about the history and legacy of “The Negro Motorist Green Book” and three nights of live performances at the Eaton DC’s rooftop. Through Sept. 29. Free-$20.

— Hau Chu, Fritz Hahn, Adele Chapin, Chris Kelly, Anne Midgette and Chris Richards

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